The Lion and the Mouse : A casual act of mercy brought an unexpected reward.
The Lion and the Mouse

WHEN the King of Jungle let a lippy little mouse go, he had no idea that he was saving his own life too.

A LION who had caught a mouse was on the point of eating it, when the little rascal spoke up.

‘Your proper prey is deer’ he squeaked crossly, ‘and creatures with horns. A meal of mouse would be no more than a grain of salt on your lips.’

The lion found him amusing, and let him go.

As fate would have it, that same day the lion fell into a pit dug by a hunter, and became entangled in a net.

He let out a great roar, and struggled with all his might, but the cords held him fast.

By and by, he heard a soft scratching sound. There was the little mouse, gnawing on the ropes.

At last the cords fell away, and the mighty lion could scramble out into the light.

And the moral of that is, that it is well worth taking care of the weak among us, even when we have no thought of return.

Based on the Greek of Babrius. See also an English version by Perry.

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Picture: © Soerfm, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
A lion with that air of imperturbable dignity which is so much part of their mystique.
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Based on a fable by
Aesop of Samos
A fox tries to save herself from a fall, but finds she would have been better off taking the tumble.
To the poor of England, the Worcestershire man gave affordable pots and pans, and to all the world he gave the industrial revolution.
An enterprising knight rids the Bishop of Durham of a troublesome boar, but the price comes as a shock to his lordship.
By The Revd Alexander Scott
(1768-1840)
High praise from someone who knew him better than most.
In encouraging women into music, Alice Mary Smith thought promises of ‘greatness’ counterproductive.
By William Cowper
(1731-1800)
A kind of Aesop’s Fable in verse, about mutual respect among those with different talents.