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Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (1) : A knight issues a bizarre challenge to King Arthur and his court.
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Part one

One New Year’s Eve, a knight rode into King Arthur’s hall. He was green, all over, and he made a strange offer.

ONE New Year’s Eve, a knight rode into King Arthur’s hall. His clothes and armour were all green; even his skin was green.

Anyone who wished, cried the strange knight, could take one free swing at him with an axe — provided that he could then do the same in return.

Sir Gawain at once agreed. He seized the axe, and with one triumphant blow swept off the green knight’s head.

But the smile was wiped from Sir Gawain’s face when the green knight picked up his head, mounted his horse, and rode away, stopping only to summon Gawain to the Green Chapel in a year and a day, to fulfil his side of the bargain.

So it was that, the following autumn, Sir Gawain set out to find the Green Chapel, and learn his fate.

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Picture: © Nachosan, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC-BY-SA 3.0. View original
The ruins of Pendragon Castle in Cumbria, named after the supposed father of King Arthur, Uther Pendragon. © Nachosan, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC-BY-SA 3.0.
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