For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Act : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Act

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Sue Sandy, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
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Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

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Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

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