For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Bay : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Bay

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Colin Smith, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
St Oswald’s Bay near West Lulworth in Dorset, part of the ‘Jurassic coast’, ninety-five miles of beautiful coastline stretching from East Devon to Dorset, with rocks recording 185 million years of geological and zoological history.
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Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

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