Language and History English a traditional approach to grammar and composition
Bees

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More like this

Polywords (177) Games with Words (282) Word and Number Puzzles (305)

Picture: © Tom Courtney, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
Fleswick Bay nestles beneath St Bees Head in Cumbria. Nearby is St Bees Priory, named after St Bega (or St Bee), an Irish woman of royal blood who fled the Viking invasions of Ireland in the years after Olaf the White conquered Dublin in 853. For centuries, a bracelet that had been St Bega’s sole possession was a cherished relic at the Priory. See our story St Bega ().
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Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: Letters Game Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
England’s rulers from the only one named ‘the Great’, to the king who lost his crown to the Danes.
Based on a story by Edith Nesbit
(1858-1924)
A tortoiseshell laments his hard life among heartless humans.
By Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)
England’s first and greatest historian explains why history is so important.
Based on the account by Reginald of Durham
(12th century)
A hungry monk thought he had got away with the tastiest of crimes, but St Cuthbert kept his promise to his beloved birds.
By Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)
The chapel of Bede’s monastery in Sunderland was full of the colours and sounds of the far-off Mediterranean world.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)
Forced from his throne and threatened with murder, Edwin makes a curious bargain for his deliverance.