For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Cave : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Cave

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Martin Dawes, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
This cave in Kirkdale, North Yorkshire, had people baffled when early 19th century scientists identified the remains of animals such as zebra and antelope. One theory was that they had been swept there in Noah’s Flood, but William Buckland, Dean of Christ Church and Professor of Geology at Oxford, showed that the cave had been the den of a hyena, and that these typically sub-Saharan creatures had once roamed Yorkshire.
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Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
(1859-1930)
High above the roof of the Amazonian rainforest, Professor Challenger sees something that eerily reminds him of home.
By Henry of Huntingdon
(?1088-?1157)
King Canute enacted a memorable demonstration of the limits of government power.
Scottish King David I hoped to exploit the unpopularity of the Normans by trading on his own English heritage.
By Elfric of Eynsham
(955-1010)
Elfric, the tenth-century English abbot, suggests a practical way of thinking about the Presentation of Christ in the Temple.
By Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)
St Bede explains how the Exodus and the Ten Commandments are related to Easter and Whitsuntide.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)
It is not politicians and their policies that create wealth, but the hard work and ingenuity of ordinary people.