For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Court : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Court

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Dave Fergusson, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
This tennis court stands beside the road from Tarbert to Hushinish, at Bunabhainneadar on the Atlantic shores of North Harris in the Outer Hebrides. The court is open to the public, rackets and balls are available for hire, and you can even get coaching. Find out more.
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Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

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One of the best-known of all battles in English history, but not because of the conflict of which it was a part.
By John Buchan
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Richard Hannay reflects on the innocent lives lost, when the lust for power or the desire for revenge makes us less than human.
Based on a short story by Amy Walton
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Part One. Ruth Lorimer’s strangely comfortless life changes when she finds a scruffy little cat on the stairs, but not everyone is pleased.
An ancient Greek myth about the dangers of easy wealth.
By John Buchan
(1875-1940)
John Buchan didn’t think much of our ‘new manners’ in foreign policy during the 1920s.
Ralph Neville spoiled David of Scotland’s alliance with France in the Hundred Years’ War