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Crag : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Crag

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Gordon Brown, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
Dalradian metamorphic rocks at Imachar on the Isle of Arran in western Scotland. ‘Dalradian’ was coined in 1891 from Dál Riata (Dalriada), the ancient kingdom split across western Scotland and northern Ireland in the late 6th and early 7th centuries. Deep layers of sedimentary and volcanic stone have been folded by seismic upheaval, and sculpted by ice and the waters of the Kilbrannan Sound. The tongue of land in the distance is the Mull of Kintyre.
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Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

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Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

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