Cut
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
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Polywords (173) Games with Words (278) Word and Number Puzzles (301)

Cut

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

Note: You can find more Polywords and other games on our Nine Lives puzzle page, and most of our stories are accompanied by games with words, grammar and numbers.

More like this

Polywords (173) Games with Words (278) Word and Number Puzzles (301)

Grammar & Composition

Based on school textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1930s to the 1960s.

Picture: © David Pickersgill, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
A village cricket match at Ledsham in the West Riding of Yorkshire, a few miles from Leeds; the spire of All Saints’ Church rises above the trees. Although the photo has the look of a 1950s postcard, it was taken on Midsummer’s Day in 2003. Close scrutiny of the batsmen’s gear and the umpire’s leg wear will confirm the date.
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letters game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: Longest Word (Letters Game) Games with Words

numbers game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

New Stories
JB Cramer was one of the finest pianists of his day, though his reverence for Mozart made his own music more popular in the drawing room than the concert hall.
By Percy Bysshe Shelley
(1792-1822)
Poet Percy Bysshe Shelley says that the pinnacle of political achievement is the government not of others, but of ourselves.
By John Keats
(1795-1821)
Poet John Keats speaks of the beauties of Autumn, her colours, her sounds and her rich harvest.
By Percy Bysshe Shelley
(1792-1822)
Poet Percy Shelley calls on November’s sister months to watch by the graveside of the dead Year.