For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Dune : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Dune

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More like this

Polywords (182) Games with Words (287) Word and Number Puzzles (310)

Picture: © Martyn Gorman, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
Sand dunes on the Sands of Forvie in Aberdeenshire, near Newburgh a few miles north of Aberdeen.
Next

Amazon Books

Featured Music

Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
By Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)
St Bede says that Christ’s Transfiguration should remind us that we live in two worlds at the same time.
By John Stuart Mill
(1806-1873)
J. S. Mill argues that free trade has done more to put an end to war than any political union or military alliance.
Pope Agatho reached out to the English church to help him make his case at an important Council in the Imperial capital.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)
Anti-Christian governments don’t make us free, they just impose their own, illiberal morality.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
There is an art to making one’s compliments seem artless.
Based on a fable by
Aesop of Samos
Brute force is no substitute for quick thinking.