Earl : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Earl

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Phil Sangwell, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
Former Great Western Railway ‘Castle’ class 5043 ‘Earl of Mount Edgcumbe’ passes Padley Wood in June 2012. The locomotive was originally named Barbury Castle, after an Iron Age hill fort in Wiltshire, but was renamed in September 1937. The historic Edgcumbe family seat is Mount Edgcumbe House near Plymouth, part of Mount Edgcumbe Country Park in Cornwall just across the River Tamar. See the website Mount Edgcumbe for more information.
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Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

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