Flit : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Flit

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Andrew Curtis, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
A Northern Brown Argus butterfly (Aricia artaxerxes), sometimes known as the Durham Argus, largely confined to northern England and central and eastern Scotland, and sadly now a rare sight. This one was photographed in Bishop Middleham, County Durham: the photographer provides lots of extra information (click the picture to read it).
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Featured Music

Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: Letters Game Games with Words

Numbers Game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

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