Hart
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
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Polywords (173) Games with Words (278) Word and Number Puzzles (301)

Hart

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

Note: You can find more Polywords and other games on our Nine Lives puzzle page, and most of our stories are accompanied by games with words, grammar and numbers.

More like this

Polywords (173) Games with Words (278) Word and Number Puzzles (301)

Grammar & Composition

Based on school textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1930s to the 1960s.

Picture: © Michael Graham, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
A cairn on Hart Crag near Hartsop in Cumbria’s Lake District. In the distance you can just make out Windermere.
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letters game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles (Letters Game) Games with Words

numbers game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

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