Inlet : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Inlet

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Hugh Venables, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
Look over towards Bamburgh (pronounced bam-bruh) Castle in Northumberland, from The Wynding.
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Featured Music

Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

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Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

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Selected Stories
Thomas Lewis was rescued from slavery with only minutes to spare.
Music by George Frideric Handel
(1685-1759)
The first thing George Frideric Handel’s oratorio ‘Messiah’ did was to set a hundred and forty-two prisoners free.
At Bamburgh, John Sharp organised free healthcare and education, bargain groceries, and the world’s first coastguard service.
Alexander fulfilled the letter of a prophecy and he did become ruler of the world, but it wasn’t quite fair.
By Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom
(1819-1901)
No religion or race should enjoy special status or protection under British law.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)
Victorian MP Richard Cobden offered a startling analogy for the American Civil War.