For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Lane : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Lane

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or London (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More like this

Polywords (182) Games with Words (287) Word and Number Puzzles (310)

Picture: © Steve Sheppard, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
A typically English - or more precisely, Welsh - country lane, in Monmouthshire.
Next

Amazon Books

Featured Music

Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: Letters Game Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
From ‘History of the Wars’ by Procopius of Caesarea
(c.500—c.560)
The Roman Emperor Honorius, so the story goes, had more on his mind than the impending sack of one of Europe’s iconic cities.
Orpheus would lose his beloved wife Eurydice to death not once, but twice.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)
A reflection on what builds real character
Handel’s German boss fired the composer for spending all his time in London. When they met again, it was... rather awkward.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Harriet Smith’s school gave her a grounding in good sense that even Emma Woodhouse could not quite overthrow.
By Elfric of Eynsham
(955-1010)
Abbot Elfric expounds a Palm Sunday text to explain how Christianity combines orderly behaviour with intelligent and genuine liberty.