Language and History English two-minute tales, music and mental agility puzzles
Lead : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Lead

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More like this

Polywords (181) Games with Words (286) Word and Number Puzzles (309)

Picture: © Ashley Dace, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
Killhope lead mine in County Durham.
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Featured Music

Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
In the time of King George III, Parliament forgot that its job was not to regulate the people, but to represent them.
Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony was commissioned by a fiercely independent Britain, and Beethoven was excited to oblige.
By Ethel Smyth
(1858-1944)
Composer Ethel Smyth buys a new-fangled ladies’ bicycle, and scandalises the neighbours.
By Jonathan Swift
(1667-1745)
Lemuel Gulliver finds that the people of Balnibarbi just don’t appreciate their hardworking academics.
Based on a fable by Hans Christian Andersen
(1805-1875)
A fastidious prince felt he deserved a girl of royal refinement, and he certainly found one.
Edmond Halley will forever be associated with the comet named after him, but his greatest achievement was getting Sir Isaac Newton to publish ‘Principia Mathematica’.