For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Mouse : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Mouse

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Pam Fray, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
Robert Thompson (1876-1955) earned himself the nickname of ‘the mouseman of Kilburn’ for his trademark mouse, included in his furniture for church and home. This weather-beaten chap is atop the gatepost of the Church of St Michael and St George in Castleton, in the North York Moors National Park.
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Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

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Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

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