For learning. For inspiration. Or just for fun.
Nest : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Nest

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Wknight94, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC-BY-SA 3.0. View original
Close inspection will reveal a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and chick in their nest in Punta Gorda, Florida, USA.
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Featured Music

Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: Letters Game Games with Words

Numbers Game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

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