Language and History English two-minute tales, music and mental agility puzzles
Rare : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Rare

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More like this

Polywords (181) Games with Words (286) Word and Number Puzzles (309)

Picture: © Des Blenkinsopp, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
The snake’s head fritillary, now a rarity in the UK, except where meadowland has lain undisturbed for many years. This one is near Ducklington in Oxfordshire.
Previous
Next

Amazon Books

Featured Music

Letters Game

What is the longest word you can make using these letters?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: Letters Game Games with Words

Numbers Game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Target Number (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
Alfred Bird’s wife could eat neither eggs nor yeast. So being a Victorian, Alfred put his thinking-cap on.
Thomas Wright never earned more than a foreman’s wage, but he helped hundreds of prisoners back into society.
Based on an account by Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)
A Danish soldier in the seventeenth century imposes the severest sentence he can think of.
In 1381, fourteen-year-old King Richard II was faced with a popular uprising against excessive taxation and government meddling in the labour market.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
George Stephenson argued that his steam engines were solar-powered.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)
Charles Dickens rails at the way Parliament and do-gooders treat the public like an irresponsible child.