Language and History English two-minute tales, music and mental agility puzzles
Ring : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Ring

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Polywords (181) Games with Words (286) Word and Number Puzzles (309)

Picture: © Simon Ledingham, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
‘Long Meg and her Daughters’ is an ancient stone circle in Cumbria, from about 1500 BC. Legend says that Meg (the tall red sandstone pillar) and her daughters (the granite circle) were turned to stone for conducting pagan rites on the Lord’s Day, and also that one cannot count the stones from within the circle and get the same number twice. More at VisitCumbria.
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Letters Game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: High Tiles Games with Words

Numbers Game

Work across from the number on the left, applying each arithmetical operation to the previous answer. What’s the final total?

Tip: Click any of the four inner squares to check your running total.

More like this: Maths Steps (Mental Arithmetic Game) Mental Arithmetic

Selected Stories
In the time of King George III, Parliament forgot that its job was not to regulate the people, but to represent them.
Henry VII must decide how to deal with a boy calling himself ‘King Edward VI’.
An ancient Greek myth about the dangers of easy wealth.
Benjamin Jesty and Edward Jenner continue to save millions of lives because they listened to an old wives’ tale.
By William Shakespeare
(1564-1616)
John of Gaunt watches in despair as his country is milked for its wealth and shared out among the king’s favourites.
By Mark Twain
(1835-1910)
Mark Twain covets the supreme sensation of being a trailblazer.