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Weir : Make as many words as you can from the letters of a 9-letter word. Can you beat our score?
Weir

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

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Picture: © Andrew Curtis, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
A rough-and-ready weir on the River Wear in County Durham, as it passes Escomb, halfway between Bishop Auckland and Crook.
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Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

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