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Triplet No. 13 : Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.
Triplet No. 13

FOR each group of three words, find one letter (except final S) that can be added to all three words to produce three new words.

When you have finished, rearrange your letters to give the name of a town in the South Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Find one letter that will change all three words into three new ones. For example, add L to ATE, RIFE, GROW to get LATE, RIFLE, GROWL.

The added letter may be S (e.g. PAT → PAST), but it won’t be a plural or third person singular (like CAT → CATS or ASK → ASKS).

Type your letter into the square at the left-hand side of each group of three words. Click the magnifying glass () to see the answer for one group of words.

When you have found all your letters, you will see an anagram at the foot of your puzzle. See if you can solve it.

drive*,s*ip,*arrow
new*,*oil,s*ack
cap*,po*t,re*d
co*y,je*t,*pray
h*ard,vet*,*wed
*rash,pe*er,s*ave

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Picture: © Chris Allen, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
What is the name of the town just across the River Dart from this GWR 0-6-0 tender engine No. 3205 and its train? Solve the puzzle to find out.

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