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Triplet No. 8 : Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.
Triplet No. 8

FOR each group of three words, find one letter (except final S) that can be added to all three words to produce three new words.

When you have finished, rearrange your letters to give the name of a town in the North East of England.

Find one letter that will change all three words into three new ones. For example, add L to ATE, RIFE, GROW to get LATE, RIFLE, GROWL.

The added letter may be S (e.g. PAT → PAST), but it won’t be a plural or third person singular (like CAT → CATS or ASK → ASKS).

Type your letter into the square at the left-hand side of each group of three words. Click the magnifying glass () to see the answer for one group of words.

When you have found all your letters, you will see an anagram at the foot of your puzzle. See if you can solve it.

*ally,b*oth,stu*dy
l*athe,m*ist,pest*
poke*,st*ew,vi*al
chin*,*isle,st*ir
*addle,fro*sty,s*ap
*angle,*ink,in*ure

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Picture: © Andrew Curtis, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0. View original
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