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Daffodils : A poem about the blessing of fond memories.
Daffodils

William Wordsworth (1770-1850)

Wordsworth indulges in the comfortable memory of a walk beside Ullswater in the English lake District, and reflects that to remember happiness is to live it twice.

I WANDERED lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed — and gazed — but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:

For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

William Wordsworth (1770-1850)

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Picture: © David Dixon, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. View original
Not exactly a ‘dancing host’, but these are daffodils near Ullswater in Cumbria’s Lake District, the very lake beside which Wordsworth saw his famous flowers.
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