all (det.)
In all forms of Government the people is the true legislator.
Edmund Burke (1729-1797), ‘Tracts on the Popery Laws’
Palace of Westminster from the air. © Miguel Mendez, Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 2.0.
by (prep.)
This other Eden, demi-paradise,
This fortress built by Nature for herself.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616), From ‘Richard II’
Seven Sisters, East Sussex. © David Iliff, Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 3.0.
quiet (adj.)
It is a beauteous evening, calm and free,
The holy time is quiet as a nun,
Breathless with adoration.
William Wordsworth (1770-1850), ‘It is a Beauteous Evening’
Wasdale from Wastwater. © GkgAlf, Wikimedia Commons.
goodwill (n.)
Commerce first taught nations to see with goodwill the wealth and prosperity of one another.
J.S. Mill (1806-1873), ‘Principles of Political Economy’
Millennium Bridge and The Sage, Gateshead. © Martin Sotirov, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0
eye (n.)
It was a sweet view — sweet to the eye and the mind. English verdure, English culture, English comfort.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), ‘Emma’
Glenridding, Cumbria. © David Iliff, Wikimedia Commons.
english language and history .com
Passages from history, myth and fiction
for work in grammar and composition
UK summer time
1
The Gift of the Gab
Music: Ignaz Moscheles
There was one form of power that self-taught engineering genius George Stephenson never harnessed.

ONE evening, when staying with Sir Robert Peel at his country house in Derbyshire, Stephenson fell into animated conversation with William Buckland, the eccentric geologist and palaeontologist, about the formation of coal.

Buckland, a veteran debater, loftily dismissed Stephenson’s theories, but the tongue-tied engineer was certain he was right.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Brief. Instruct.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Hand. Lead. Debate.

Use together in one sentence: Stay with. About. Eccentric.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Golden Age of Carausius
Music: Henry Purcell
A Roman commander facing court martial took refuge in politics, and for ten years London was an imperial capital.

IN 286, Carausius was appointed to command the ‘Britannic Fleet’, patrolling the English Channel to keep Franks and Saxons from raiding Britain’s southern coasts. Rumour had it, however, that he let some raiders through so he could pocket their plunder for himself, and Emperor Maximian summoned him for a court martial.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Honest. Frank. Blunt.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Age. Spirit. Return.

Use together in one sentence: Court. Poet. However.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Heracles and the Girdle of Hippolyte
Music: George Frideric Handel
A princess covets the belt of a warrior-queen, so Heracles is despatched to get it for her.

ONE day, Eurystheus’s daughter Admete expressed a fancy for the girdle of Hippolyte, Queen of the Amazons, a formidable tribe of female warriors who cast off their sons and raised their daughters like men. The doting Eurystheus at once sent Heracles to fetch it from Themiscyra, on the southern shores of the Black Sea.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Assassinate. Murder. Kill.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Order. Man. Mean.

Use together in one sentence: Help. Queen. Brave.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Bede and the Paschal Controversy
Music: George Frideric Handel
The earliest Christians longed to celebrate the resurrection together at Passover, but that was not as easy as it sounds.

CHRIST died and rose again at Passover, the week-long Jewish festival at the first full moon of Spring. Christians had always wanted to celebrate Easter at that time each year, but no astronomer could determine the vernal equinox or full moon with precision.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Weak. Week.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Spring. Say. Respect.

Use together in one sentence: Vernal. Gather. Always.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Sense and Sensitivity
Music: John Field
Jane Austen wrote as a Christian, but all the better for doing so unobtrusively.

MISS Austin has the merit (in our judgment most essential) of being evidently a Christian writer: a merit which is much enhanced, both on the score of good taste, and of practical utility, by her religion being not at all obtrusive.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Practical. Practicable.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Taste. Book. Score.

Use together in one sentence: Prepare. Throw. Essential.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Education of the Heart
Music: Johann Christian Bach
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.

TOO late he became aware how unfavourable to the character of any young people must be the totally opposite treatment which Maria and Julia had been always experiencing at home, where the excessive indulgence and flattery of their aunt had been continually contrasted with his own severity.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Price. Cost. Value.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Care. Cost. Profit.

Use together in one sentence: Disposition. Can. Severity.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.