instead of (prep.)
The Kingdom of Uganda is a fairy tale. You climb up a railway instead of a beanstalk, and at the end there is a wonderful new world.
Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965), ‘My African Journey’ (1909)
Lake Bunyonyi, Uganda. © Carine06, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0.
all (det.)
In all forms of Government the people is the true legislator.
Edmund Burke (1729-1797), ‘Tracts on the Popery Laws’
Palace of Westminster from the air. © Miguel Mendez, Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 2.0.
play (vb)
The only way of really finding out a man’s true character is to play golf with him.
P.G. Wodehouse (1881-1975), ‘The Clicking of Cuthbert’
Wentworth Golf Course. © Alan Hunt, Geograph. CC BY-SA 2.0.
prosper (vb)
When David had chosen Jerusalem to be his royal city, his affairs did more and more prosper, by the providence of God.
Titus Flavius Josephus (AD 37-100), ‘Antiquities of the Jews’
Busy street near the Jaffa Gate, Jerusalem, Israel. © Eldad Cohen Tzedek, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.5.
diligent (adj.)
Where wages are high, we shall always find the workmen more active, diligent, and expeditious, than where they are low.
Adam Smith (1723-1790), ‘Wealth of Nations’
Historic textile machinery in Burnley, Lancashire. © Clem Rutter, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0.
english language and history .com
Passages from history, myth and fiction
for work in grammar and composition
UK summer time
3
St Erkenwald, Light of London
Music: Franz Joseph Haydn
The seventh-century Bishop of London helped kings and clergy to shine Christian light into the darkness of mere religion.

ERKENWALD was born into a family of royal blood in the Kingdom of Lindsey around 630, and used his inheritance to found a monastery for himself in Chertsey near London, and another for his sister Ethelburga in Barking.

In 674, King Sebbi of Essex was baptised, and Erkenwald’s part in this, together with the high reputation of his two monastic communities, led Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, to appoint Erkenwald as Bishop of London in 675.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Light. Alight.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Fire. Use. Light.

Use together in one sentence: Together. Monastery. Light.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Mr Ivery Gets Away
Music: Camille Saint-Saens
Richard Hannay tracks a German spy down to a French château, but Hannay’s sense of fair play gives his enemy a chance.

‘HULLO, Mr Ivery,’ I said. ‘This is an odd place to meet again!’

In his amazement he fell back a step, while his hungry eyes took in my face. There was no mistake about the recognition. I saw something I had seen once before in him, and that was fear. Out went the light and he sprang for the door.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Meet. Meat. Mete.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Pass. Use. Step.

Use together in one sentence: Fire. Instant. Smooth.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Russia’s First Railway
Music: Mikhail Glinka
Sixteen-year-old John Wesley Hackworth brought a locomotive over to St Petersburg, and Russia’s railway revolution was ready for the off.

IN 1836, sixteen-year-old John Wesley Hackworth arrived in the Russian capital, St Petersburg, bearing the heavy responsibility of delivering a steam locomotive, built by his father Timothy at Shildon in County Durham, to the Russian Empire’s first railway line.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Notorious. Famous.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Line. Eye. Track.

Use together in one sentence: Railway. Purse. How.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The ‘Ladies’ Diary’
Music: Ann Sheppard Mounsey
A long-lived annual of riddles, rhymes and really hard maths aimed specifically at Georgian Britain’s hidden public of clever women.

THE ‘Ladies’ Diary’, published annually in London from 1704 to 1841, offered an almanack of useful dates, astronomical events, rhyming riddles and readers’ queries, such as

“I should be glad to know, what is the composition of the India rubber; and how and where it is made”.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Broadcast. Publish.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Feature. Issue. Date.

Use together in one sentence: Dub. Provide. Know.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

John Dalton
Music: Jan Ladislav Dussek
At fifteen John Dalton was a village schoolmaster in Kendal; at forty he had published the first scientific theory of atoms.

JOHN Dalton, a weaver’s boy, began his teaching career at fifteen, helping his elder brother to run a Quaker school in Kendal. He deepened his education by contributing maths problems to The Ladies’ Diary, and reading scientific works to Kendal’s distinguished natural philosopher John Gough, who was blind, in exchange for lessons in Latin and Greek.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Calendar. Diary. Journal.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Post. Read. Help.

Use together in one sentence: Work. Include. Weight.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Undoubting Thomas
Music: George Frideric Handel
Abbot Elfric praised St Thomas for demanding hard evidence for the resurrection.

THOMAS’S unbelief in Christ’s resurrection was not unforeseen, but happened in the foresight of God; for his touch made believers of us. His doubt did us more good than the other Apostles’ belief. For when that touch brought him to belief, it carried our doubt away.

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