sanctuary (n.)
As long as you keep this country as the sanctuary of liberty, wherever the chosen race and sons of England worship freedom, they will turn their faces towards you.
Edmund Burke (1729-1797), ‘Speech on Conciliation with America (1775)’
White horses, Falkland Islands. © Vogelfreund, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0.
goodwill (n.)
Commerce first taught nations to see with goodwill the wealth and prosperity of one another.
J.S. Mill (1806-1873), ‘Principles of Political Economy’
Millennium Bridge and The Sage, Gateshead. © Martin Sotirov, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0
eye (n.)
It was a sweet view — sweet to the eye and the mind. English verdure, English culture, English comfort.
Jane Austen (1775-1817), ‘Emma’
Glenridding, Cumbria. © David Iliff, Wikimedia Commons.
promote (vb)
The increase of riches and commerce in any one nation, instead of hurting, commonly promotes the riches and commerce of all its neighbours.
David Hume (1711-1776), ‘Of the Jealousy of Trade’
Beyer Peacock (Manchester) Z12 No. 1020 in Australia. © Arhsact, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0.
elicit (vb)
The task of leadership is not to put greatness into humanity, but to elicit it, for the greatness is already there.
John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (1875-1940), ‘Montrose and Leadership’ (1930)
Ottawa, Canada. By Mr Drake, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: Public domain.
english language and history .com
Passages from history, myth and fiction
for work in grammar and composition
UK summer time
90
November
Music: Jan Ladislav Dussek
Humorist Thomas Hood obviously didn’t like to see the nights drawing in

NO sun - no moon!
No morn — no noon —
No dawn — no dusk — no proper time of day.
No warmth, no cheerfulness, no healthful ease,
No comfortable feel in any member.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Shade. Colour.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Sun. Shine. Ease.

Use together in one sentence: Butterflies. Feel. Healthful.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Ozymandias
Music: Camille Saint-Saens
The glory of political power soon passes away.

I MET a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Lay. Lie.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Name. Hand. Sand.

Use together in one sentence: Desert. Frown. Read.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

More like this