English Language and History .com is a collection of two-minute tales drawn from history, myth and fiction. Each tale is accompanied by word games testing grammar and expression, based on textbooks used in British schools from the 1920s to the 1960s.

A World of Differences
Music: Samuel Wesley
Emma tries to reconcile her father to the unaccountable tastes of his nearest and dearest.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“ONCE Henry asked me for a knife, but I told him knives were only made for grandpapas. I think their father is too rough with them very often.”

“He appears rough to you,” said Emma, “because you are so very gentle yourself; but if you could compare him with other papas, you would not think him rough.”

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Six Posts
Jane Austen
two-part story
Music: Muzio Clementi
The blushing clergyman’s daughter is recognised today as one of the great figures of English literature.

GEORGE Austen, a rural clergyman in Steventon, Hampshire, was blessed with a family of six sons and two daughters.

His next-to-youngest child was Jane, whom he encouraged to write tales for the family’s entertainment. A busy round of relatives and parishioners provided plenty of material for her acute observation.

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Sense and Sensitivity
Music: John Field
Jane Austen wrote as a Christian, but all the better for doing so unobtrusively.
By Richard Whately
(1787-1863)

MISS Austin has the merit (in our judgment most essential) of being evidently a Christian writer: a merit which is much enhanced, both on the score of good taste, and of practical utility, by her religion being not at all obtrusive.

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Practice Makes Perfect
Music: George Frederick Pinto
Making friends is, like playing music, not just a matter of natural talent.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“I CERTAINLY have not the talent which some people possess,” said Darcy, “of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.”

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First Impressions, Second Thoughts
Music: George Frederick Pinto
Elizabeth Bennet began to wonder if being Mr Darcy’s wife might have had its compensations.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

THE rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of their proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendour, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.

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A Tempting Offer
Music: Muzio Clementi
True moral integrity comes from within.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“IS there anything I can do for you in town? I have half an idea of going into Norfolk again soon. I am not satisfied about Maddison. I am sure he still means to impose on me if possible, and get a cousin of his own into a certain mill, which I design for somebody else.

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Education of the Heart
Music: Johann Christian Bach
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

TOO late he became aware how unfavourable to the character of any young people must be the totally opposite treatment which Maria and Julia had been always experiencing at home, where the excessive indulgence and flattery of their aunt had been continually contrasted with his own severity.

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All Posts
Tagged Jane Austen (16 posts)
page 1
1 A World of Differences
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Emma tries to reconcile her father to the unaccountable tastes of his nearest and dearest.
2 One False Step
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Louisa Musgrove thought she had hit on a sure method of winning Captain Wentworth’s affections.
3 Education of the Heart
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.
4 Sense and Sensitivity
By Richard Whately
(1787-1863)
Jane Austen wrote as a Christian, but all the better for doing so unobtrusively.
5 Well Out Of It
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Anne Elliot is mortified to hear Frederick Wentworth’s opinion of her, but manages to find comfort in his words.
6 Swept off her Feet
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Marianne Dashwood sprains an ankle, but help is at hand.
page 2
7 Jane Austen
The blushing clergyman’s daughter is recognised today as one of the great figures of English literature.
8 A Proper Education
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Harriet Smith’s school gave her a grounding in good sense that even Emma Woodhouse could not quite overthrow.
9 First Impressions, Second Thoughts
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Elizabeth Bennet began to wonder if being Mr Darcy’s wife might have had its compensations.
10 A Tempting Offer
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
True moral integrity comes from within.
11 Practice Makes Perfect
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Making friends is, like playing music, not just a matter of natural talent.
12 In Good Company
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Anne Elliot resents being expected to court the society of anyone simply because of social status.
page 3
13 With the Compliments of Mr Collins
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
There is an art to making one’s compliments seem artless.
14 Fanny Comes Home
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
Fanny Price, eight years after being adopted by her wealthy uncle and aunt, has gone back home for the first time, full of anticipation.
15 Are Women more faithful than Men?
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
A touchy subject, especially when your lover is listening in.
16 The Tide of Popularity
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)
First impressions prove to be quite misleading in the case of handsome, disagreeable Mr Darcy.
Authors
Jane Austen (1775-1817)
14 posts
Richard Whately (1787-1863)
1 post

Word Play: Active or Passive?

Use each of the verbs below in either the active or the passive form. Can you use both forms?

Leave. Crew. Marry.

New Stories
The only truly global conflict in history began when German troops crossed into Poland in September 1939.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)
Richard Cobden questioned both the wisdom and the motives of politicians who intervene on foreign soil.
To the poor of England, the Worcestershire man gave affordable pots and pans, and to all the world he gave the industrial revolution.
After Louis XIV’s grandson Philip inherited the throne of Spain, the ‘Sun King’ began to entertain dreams of Europe-wide dominion.
New Puzzles
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Try writing complete sentences using these nouns as either the subject or the object of a verb.
Try writing complete sentences using these verbs in either the active or the passive voice.
Polyword ‘Billy’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

Note: You can find more Polywords and other games on our Nine Lives puzzle page, and most of our stories are accompanied by games with words, grammar and numbers.

More Puzzles
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with SWORD and finish with PEACE.
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FAST and finish with SLOW.
Do you know ‘move in a zig-zag fashion’ (4), and ‘a 1711 opera by Handel’ (7)?
An arithmetical puzzle based on the popular TV show.
Do you know ‘amusing play on words’ (3 letters), and ‘leaf of a pine tree’ (6 letters)?
See if you can guess these words letter-by-letter.
top topics
History (359)
Fiction (77)

letters game

Make words from two or more of the tiles below. What is the highest-scoring word you can make?

Press enter or type a space to see feedback on your word.

More like this: ‘Scrabble’ letters game Games with Words

numbers game

Make the total shown using two or more of the numbers underneath it. You can add, subtract, divide and multiply. Use any number once only.

More like this: Maths Gym Mental arithmetic