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British Myths and Legends (11)

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The Legend of Pollard’s Lands
Music: George Frideric Handel
An enterprising knight rids the Bishop of Durham of a troublesome boar, but the price comes as a shock to his lordship.

THE estates around Auckland Castle, seat of the Bishops of Durham, were troubled by a wild boar, so much so that the Bishop and even the King had each put up a princely reward for his head.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Aware. Awake. Alert.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Trouble. Shake. Finish.

Use together in one sentence: Gone. Down. Respectable.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Legend of King Leir
Music: Orlando Gibbons
An early British king discovers what he is really worth to his daughters.

IN the days of Ahab, King of Israel, and the prophet Elijah, there lived in Britain a King named Leir, from whom Leicester is named. He had three daughters, Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia, and in his old age he decided to divide his kingdom among them, after finding each one a suitable consort.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Each. Every. All.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Help. Divide. Name.

Use together in one sentence: Just. Help. Exactly.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

King Arthur’s Last Request
Music: Henry Purcell
The legendary British warrior makes ready for his final journey, leaving Sir Bedivere with one last duty to perform.

“I HAVE liv’d my life, and that which I have done
May He within himself make pure! but thou,
If thou shouldst never see my face again,
Pray for my soul.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Who. Which. That.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Blow. Let. Hand.

Use together in one sentence: Grievous. Chain. Life.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Cap o’ Rushes
Music: Muzio Clementi
A girl’s choice of words sees her turned out of hearth and home.

A WEALTHY man was determined to find out which of his three daughters loved him best. So he asked the first how much she loved him, and she replied ‘Why, as I love my life!’ and the second said, ‘More than all the world!’

But the third said, ‘As raw meat loves salt.’

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Meet. Meat. Mete.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Turn. Man. Walk.

Use together in one sentence: First. As. So.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Robin Hood and the Debt of Honour
Music: Richard Jones
The outlaw showed that strange as it may be, he did have a code of honour.

IT was Robin Hood’s custom to waylay a knight on the road, and invite him to dinner. As they finished their wine, Robin would ask how much money his guest was carrying, and if he lied, a tut-tutting Robin confiscated it.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Will. Would.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Say. Pay. Search.

Use together in one sentence: Thorough. Son. Invite.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Knight, the Lady, and the Forest of Sorrow
Music: Francesco Geminiani
A little fable of encouragement for all the suffering.

ONCE upon a time, a company of knights rode upon the marches of a thick forest. Night lay upon it, and whoever turned aside from that path was held fast in its thorny briars, and lost in its darkness.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Lay. Lie.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Stand. Lead. Name.

Use together in one sentence: Upon. Knight. Miss one’s way.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.