Posts tagged Cat Stories (28)
Nos 1 to 10
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George Frideric Handel
The Cat’s Wedding
It’s easier to change how you look than to hide who you are.
Based on a fable by
Aesop of Samos

Aphrodite felt sorry for the lovesick cat, and did indeed turn her into a very lovely young woman. Naturally, the young man immediately fell in love with her, and they were soon married.

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No. 1
2 two-part story
Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky
The Wolf, the Bear and Cat Ivanovitch
A faithful but unprepossessing pet is turned out of hearth and home.

ONCE upon a time, a peasant decided that his ginger cat, a battle-scarred mouser with one ear, was not the sort of pet to be seen with. So he popped old Tom in a sack, and dumped him in the forest.

Tom clawed his way out of his sack, and set off to explore his new world.

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No. 2
2 two-part story
Johannes Brahms
The Convert
Victorian cat-lover Harrison Weir launches into his favourite subject, but finds his audience growing restive.
By Harrison Weir
(1824-1906)

“STOP,” said my friend, “I see you do like cats, and I do not, so let the matter drop.”

“No,” said I, “not so. That is why I instituted this Cat Show; I wish every one to see how beautiful a well-cared-for cat is, and how docile, gentle, and — may I use the term? — cossetty. Come with me, my dear old friend, and see the first Cat Show.”

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No. 3
2 two-part story
Charles Villiers Stanford and Sir Arthur Sullivan
Pangur Bán
A 9th century Irish monk scribbled some verses about a beloved cat into his copy book.
By Anonymous (Irish Monk)
(9th century)

I, AND Pangur Bán —
each doing what he does best:
his mind on the hunt,
mine on my own pursuits.

I love, better than fame, relaxing
with my texts, in painstaking study;
Pangur Bán does not envy me that:
he loves his own childish craft.

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No. 4
Frank Bridge
The Cats of Harrison Weir
A Victorian artist and avid bird-watcher banished cats from his country cottage, but soon wished he hadn’t.

THE world’s first cat show, held at London’s Crystal Palace in 1871, was organised by Harrison Weir, artist, illustrator and bird-watcher.

Harrison had learnt drawing and engraving under George Baxter, the pioneer of commercial colour printing. As songbirds were a favourite subject, later on he bought himself a country cottage so he could observe them from his window. Cats, reluctantly, were forbidden.

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No. 5
2 two-part story
Albert Ketèlbey
Persian Treasures
‘Be careful what you wish for’, they say, and there could be no more endearing example.
By Edith Nesbit
(1858-1924)

‘MY hat!’ Cyril remarked. ‘I never thought about its being a PERSIAN carpet.’

Yet it was now plain that it was so, for the beautiful objects which it had brought back were cats — Persian cats, grey Persian cats, and there were, as I have said, 199 of them, and they were sitting on the carpet as close as they could get to each other.

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No. 6
2 two-part story
Gustav Holst
Tom and Terrier
A fox terrier spies what looks like a hapless victim – until he gets up close.
By Jerome K. Jerome
(1859-1927)

HALF-way up the High Street a cat darted out from one of the houses in front of us, and began to trot across the road. Montmorency gave a cry of joy — the cry of a stern warrior who sees his enemy given over to his hands — the sort of cry Cromwell might have uttered when the Scots came down the hill — and flew after his prey.

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No. 7
2 two-part story
John Field
The Friendship of Cats
A cat’s affection is not easy to win, but the rewards make the effort worthwhile.
By Théophile Gautier
(1811-1872)

WINNING the friendship of a cat is a difficult business. The cat is a philosophical creature, methodical, quiet, tenacious of his habits, fond of order and cleanliness, who does not scatter his affections about indiscriminately.

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No. 8
Sir Arthur Sullivan
Belling the Cat
A council of mice comes up with a plan to outsmart the Cat, but volunteers are a bit thin on the ground.
Based on a fable by
Aesop of Samos

LONG ago, the Mice gathered in anxious council to debate how they could best defend themselves against their great enemy, the Cat.

After a great deal of excited squeaking, one Mouse addressed the assembly with statesmanlike gravity.

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No. 9
2 two-part story
Johann Baptist Cramer
The Cat Who Walks by Himself
Part One. The sly cat hatches a plan to get all the benefits of domestic life without any of the responsibilities.
Based on a short story by Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

AFTER he was tamed by Woman, Wild Man tamed Wild Cow and Wild Horse with food and shelter, but not Wild Cat. ‘I am the Cat who walks by himself’ he said haughtily, ‘and all places are alike to me’.

And Woman laughed, for though the wild woods were cold and wet, the Cat would not serve.

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No. 10
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Polywords (178)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Grebe
Added on Monday November 20th, 2017
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Today in History
955 King Edred of England, son of King Edward the Elder and younger brother of King Edmund, died in Frome, Somerset, after nine years on the throne
From our Archive
A young Indian student from Cambridge was selected for England’s cricket team after public pressure.
By Sir Walter Scott
(1771-1832)
A mysterious knight and an equally mysterious outlaw agree to preserve one another’s incognito.
By Plutarch
(AD 45-120)
Alexander the Great dropped a hint to his sycophantic entourage.
MacPherson’s tireless afforts to promote Russian sport earned him a unique Imperial honour, and the enmity of the Communists.
Two of Heracles’s labours are declared void, so to make up the number he is sent to find the Garden of the Hesperides.

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Fiction (123)
Georgian Era (113)
Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Railways (30)
Triplets (23)
Stuart Era (20)
Tudor Era (11)
Polyword ‘Court’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘meticulous’ (7 letters), and ‘father of Goneril, Regan and Cordelia’ (4 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with TOWN and finish with CITY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.