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Entries tagged as
Christian Customs (5)
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The Return of Plum Pudding
Music: John Playford
The Puritans said it was unfit for God-fearing men, but George I thought it fit for a King.

RICH and luxurious plum pudding was banned as “unfit for God-fearing people” by the republican Puritans in 1647, prompting riots in Kent.

Christmas celebrations returned with Charles II in 1660, and in 1714 King George I requested plum pudding for his first Christmas in England, making it fashionable once again.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Recall. Recollect.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Use. Set. Prompt.

Use together in one sentence: Wish. God-fearing. Ingredient.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Mothering Sunday
Music: George Butterworth
Mothering Sunday is a peculiarly British celebration of Christian faith, close family and responsible freedom.

CONSTANCE Smith worked in a Nottingham dispensary for the Girls’ Friendly Society, helping young women without family support. In 1920, her experiences led her to campaign for the wider observance of Mothering Sunday.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Observance. Observation.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Lead. Reward. Trust.

Use together in one sentence: At. Scatter. Lent.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Aaron’s Rod
Music: Johann Baptist Cramer
The Victorian practice of hanging sugared nuts on a Christmas tree was bursting with Biblical symbolism.

GOD bade Moses, the leader, take twelve dry rods from the twelve tribes of the people of Israel, and lay them before the holy ark within the great tabernacle: and he would by those rods declare whom he had chosen for bishop.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Manifold. Manifest.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Lay. Blow. Man.

Use together in one sentence: Trib. Law. Redeem.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Sunday of Palms and Willows
Music: George Frideric Handel
For centuries, northern countries from Russia to England have laid the catkins of the willow tree before Jesus as he enters Jerusalem.

PALM Sunday commemorates the occasion when Jesus entered Jerusalem seated on a donkey, in deliberate fulfilment of the prophet Zechariah’s promise that one day Israel’s king would return to her capital in just that fashion.

His excited followers laid palm fronds in his path, and called him their King, crying “Hosanna to the son of David”.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Ally. Friend. Confederate.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Lay. Change. Call.

Use together in one sentence: Year. Life. Commemorate.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Wassail and Twelfth-Cake
Music: John Playford
When England’s Christians absorbed the pagan traditions of ‘wassailing’, they kept the fun and cast out the fear.

IN Anglo-Saxon times, the New Year greeting ‘wæs hāl’ (‘Be well!’) was followed by ‘wassail’, spiced mead or cider, and wassail-songs.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Raise. Rise. Arise.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Egg. Find. Field.

Use together in one sentence: Mead. Become. Mediaeval.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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