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Fiction (64)
1
A King-Sized Conspiracy
Music: Jan Ladislav Dussek
Rudolf Rassendyll is on holiday in Ruritania when he stumbles across a plot by the King’s brother to steal the crown.

FOR a moment or two we were all silent; then Sapt, knitting his bushy grey brows, took his pipe from his mouth and said to me:

“As a man grows old he believes in Fate. Fate sent you here. Fate sends you now to Strelsau.”

I staggered back, murmuring “Good God!”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Grave. Tomb.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Cry. Hand. Clock.

Use together in one sentence: Catch. Grave. Shave.

More games: Précis. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Education of the Heart
Music: Johann Christian Bach
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.

TOO late he became aware how unfavourable to the character of any young people must be the totally opposite treatment which Maria and Julia had been always experiencing at home, where the excessive indulgence and flattery of their aunt had been continually contrasted with his own severity.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Each. Every. All.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Cost. Sense. Care.

Use together in one sentence: Profit. Daughter. Religion.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Knight and the Outlaw
Music: John Jenkins
A mysterious knight and an equally mysterious outlaw agree to preserve one another’s incognito.

“SIR Knight,” said the Outlaw, “we have each our secret. You are welcome to form your judgment of me, and I may use my conjectures touching you, though neither of our shafts may hit the mark they are shot at. But as I do not pray to be admitted into your mystery, be not offended that I preserve my own.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Ally. Friend. Confederate.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Hand. Meet. Mark.

Use together in one sentence: On. May. Concealment.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Mr Ivery Gets Away
Music: Camille Saint-Saens
Richard Hannay tracks a German spy down to a French château, but Hannay’s sense of fair play gives his enemy a chance.

‘HULLO, Mr Ivery,’ I said. ‘This is an odd place to meet again!’

In his amazement he fell back a step, while his hungry eyes took in my face. There was no mistake about the recognition. I saw something I had seen once before in him, and that was fear. Out went the light and he sprang for the door.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Lamp. Light. Torch.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Mistake. Crash. Light.

Use together in one sentence: Moat. Before. Thing.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Redeeming Time
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
Pip Pirrip never misses a moment of visiting time with Abel Magwitch, the convict who made him into a gentleman, in the prison hospital.

“DEAR boy,” he said, as I sat down by his bed: “I thought you was late. But I knowed you couldn’t be that. God bless you! You’ve never deserted me, dear boy.”

I pressed his hand in silence, for I could not forget that I had once meant to desert him.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Lamp. Light. Torch.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Smile. Pain. Light.

Use together in one sentence: Hand. Pain. Back.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Tempest
Music: Matthew Locke
A duke with a passion for the art of enchantment is stranded by his enemies on a deserted island.

PROSPERO, Duke of Milan, a keen student of spells and enchantments, was so wrapped up in his books of lore that his brother Antonio thought the duchy would be better in other hands. So he conspired with Alonso, King of Naples, to have Prospero and his three-year-old daughter Miranda taken out to sea, and set adrift.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Will. Would.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Help. Hand. Mean.

Use together in one sentence: Miserable. So. Old.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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