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Charles James Fox (3)
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Douglass’s Debt
Music: Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
British statesmen were among those who inspired the career of one of America’s greatest men, Frederick Douglass.

I MET there one of Sheridan’s mighty speeches, on the subject of Catholic Emancipation, Lord Chatham’s speech on the American War, and speeches by the great William Pitt, and by Fox.

These were all choice documents to me, and I read them over and over again, with an interest ever increasing, because it was ever gaining in intelligence; for the more I read them the better I understood them.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Earthen. Earthly.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Increase. Man. Gain.

Use together in one sentence: Search. Brilliant. Because.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Honourable Mr Fox
Music: Thomas Linley the Younger
The colourful Foreign Secretary humbly accepted a lesson in manners from a local tradesman.

THE story is told of a tradesman calling upon him one day for the payment of a promissory note which he presented. Fox was engaged at the time in counting out gold. The tradesman asked to be paid from the money before him. “No,” said Fox, “I owe this money to Sheridan; it is a debt of honour.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Although. Also.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Touch. Count. Show.

Use together in one sentence: Easily. Its. Before.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Heads I Win, Tails You Lose!
(That’s cat-tails, obviously.) And who ever said cats were unpredictable?

ONE broiling hot summer’s day Charles James Fox and the Prince of Wales were lounging up St. James’s street, and Fox laid the Prince a wager that he would see more Cats than his Royal Highness would during their promenade, although the Prince might choose which side of the street he thought fit.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: There. Their. They’re.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Fit. Leave. Reach.

Use together in one sentence: Than. This. Ask.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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