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Anglo-Saxon History (35)
1
Alfred Learns To Read
Music: Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Even as a child, King Alfred couldn’t resist a challenge.

AT twelve years old, Alfred had not been taught to read; although, of the sons of King Ethelwulf, he, the youngest, was the favourite.

But he had — as most men who grow up to be great and good are generally found to have had — an excellent mother.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Learn. Teach.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Read. Name. Book.

Use together in one sentence: Tutor. Learn. Bright.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Lost Innocence
Music: Frank Bridge
In the fourth century, Britain’s Christians acquired a taste for watering down the mystery of their message.

WHERE the uproar of persecution subsided, Christ’s faithful, who during the crisis had buried themselves in woods and remote, lonely caves, went out in public. They renovated ruined churches, founded, built and finished off churches dedicated to the holy martyrs, unfurling them everywhere like victory banners, and celebrated feast days, doing everything with clean and holy hearts and lips.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Found. Founded.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Firm. Spread. Hold.

Use together in one sentence: High. Pus. Peace.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Last Commandment
Music: George Frideric Handel
Northumbrian poet Cynewulf imagines the farewell between Jesus and his Apostles, forty days after his resurrection.

“BE glad of heart! Never shall I wander; my love shall follow you unceasingly. My might I give you, and I am with you always, even unto the end, that through my gift none shall ever lack God.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Threw. Through.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Comfort. Turn. Gift.

Use together in one sentence: Gift. Glad. Might.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Battle of Nechtansmere
Music: Scottish Traditional Song
King Ecgfrith of Northumbria dismissed repeated warnings about his imperial ambitions.

WHEN Ecgfrith became King of Northumbria in 670, his realm had never been stronger. The ambitious pagan King Penda of Mercia had fallen at the Battle of the Winwaed in 655, and though Penda’s Christian heir Ethelred rebuffed Ecgfrith’s advance southwards in 679, lands to the north looked promising.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Warn. Threaten.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Land. Campaign. Look.

Use together in one sentence: Subdue. Church. Become.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

St Erkenwald, Light of London
Music: Franz Joseph Haydn
The seventh-century Bishop of London helped kings and clergy to shine Christian light into the darkness of mere religion.

ERKENWALD was born into a family of royal blood in the Kingdom of Lindsey around 630, and used his inheritance to found a monastery for himself in Chertsey near London, and another for his sister Ethelburga in Barking.

In 674, King Sebbi of Essex was baptised, and Erkenwald’s part in this, together with the high reputation of his two monastic communities, led Theodore, Archbishop of Canterbury, to appoint Erkenwald as Bishop of London in 675.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Grave. Tomb.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Light. Benefit. Reward.

Use together in one sentence: Delicate. Use. Benefit.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Six Leaps of Faith
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
The eighth-century English bishop and poet Cynewulf explores a prophecy from the Song of Solomon.

WHEN first he leapt, he lighted on a woman, an untouched maid; and human form he took there (though without sin) that he might be Comforter to all that dwell on earth.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Leave. Abandon. Desert.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Band. Form. Spirit.

Use together in one sentence: First. Dance. Hour.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.