Posts tagged History of British India (23)
Nos 1 to 10
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1 2 3
2 two-part story
Francesco Geminiani
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
The Great Bengal Famine
The Governor of Bengal accused the East India Company of turning a crisis into a humanitarian catastrophe.

IN 1769, farming in Bengal was already in a weakened state after years of harassment by Maratha raiding parties, burning crops and destroying villages. Then heavy monsoon rains and a subsequent drought caused two rice harvests to fail.

Governor John Cartier could have done little about that. But in 1772, his successor Warren Hastings conducted an inquiry, and concluded that the Company had nonetheless gravely exacerbated the crisis.

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No. 1
2 two-part story
Ernest Walker
Modern History
King Edward VII (1901-1910) to King George V (1910-1936)
Srinivasa Ramanujan
A maths prodigy from Madras became so wrapped up in his sums that he forgot to pass his examinations.

SUCH was Srinivasa Ramanujan’s passion for numbers that at eleven, two college maths students who lodged with his family in Kumbakonam, near Madras, could no longer satisfy his burning curiosity. At sixteen, he borrowed a book with thousands of problems in Algebra, Trigonometry, Geometry and Calculus, and worked out solutions for them all.

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No. 2
Thomas Linley the Younger
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
An Avoidable Tragedy
Adam Smith argued that the Bengal Famine of 1769 would have been much less of a tragedy under a free trade policy.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

IN rice countries, where the crop not only requires a very moist soil, but where, in a certain period of its growing, it must be laid under water, the effects of a drought are much more dismal. Even in such countries, however, the drought is, perhaps, scarce ever so universal as necessarily to occasion a famine, if the government would allow a free trade.

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No. 3
2 two-part story
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Modern History
William Hall VC
Canadian sailor William Hall was summoned over to India to help face down the Indian Mutiny.

WILLIAM Hall volunteered for the Royal Navy in 1852, and saw action aboard HMS Rodney in the Crimea, at Inkerman and Sevastopol. Five years later, at the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, he was in Hong Kong on HMS Shannon when she was urgently summoned to Calcutta, and towed 600 miles up the Ganges to Allahabad.

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No. 4
2 two-part story
Granville Bantock
Modern History
The Siege of Lucknow
During the Indian Mutiny, over a thousand men, women and children were trapped in the Commissioner’s residence at Lucknow.

IN 1857, sepoys in the service of the East India Company joined with Indian princes in the Indian Mutiny, angered by mismanagement and presumption in the Company’s handling of Bengal and of Oudh, a recent addition to the Company’s trophy cabinet.

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No. 5
2 two-part story
William Herschel
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
Mir Kasim
The East India Company installed Mir Kasim as Nawab of Bengal, only to find that he had a mind of his own.

AFTER the Battle of Plassey in 1757, the East India Company rewarded Mir Jafar for his betrayal of Siraj-ud-Daulah by creating him Nawab of Bengal in Siraj’s place.* Jafar, however, failed to fulfil his promises of large payments from his Treasury once in power, and when his son-in-law Kasim offered to do better, the Company gave him Jafar’s throne.

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No. 6
Charles Villiers Stanford
Poets and Poetry
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
‘The Overland Mail’
A tribute to the postal workers of British India, and to the kind of empire they helped to build.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)

IN the name of the Empress of India, make way,
O Lords of the Jungle wherever you roam,
The woods are astir at the close of the day—
We exiles are waiting for letters from Home—
Let the robber retreat; let the tiger turn tail,
In the name of the Empress the Overland-Mail!

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No. 7
2 two-part story
Johann Christian Bach
Modern History
Hyder Ali and Tipu
The British encountered no stouter resistance in India than Mysore’s gifted commmander Hyder Ali and his son, Tipu.

IN 1778, King Louis XVI of France declared war on Britain, and London responded by driving the colonial French out of the port of Mahé in Mysore, a kingdom in southwest India dating back to the turn of the fifteenth century.

This trespass incensed Hyder Ali, Mysore’s brilliant military commander whose hero status had already relegated King Krishnaraja Wodeyar II to a mere figurehead.

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No. 8
2 two-part story
Nikolai Medtner
Modern History
Mysore’s Golden Age
The Princely State of Mysore (today in Karnataka) was hailed as an example of good governance to all the world.

KRISHNARAJA Wodeyar IV inherited the throne of Mysore in 1894, though his mother acted as regent until 1902. The Kingdom had a recent history of good governance, owing much to chief administrator Purniah from 1799 to 1812, and British Commissioner Sir Mark Cubbon from 1843 to 1861. A democratic legislature had been introduced in 1881.

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No. 9
George Frideric Handel
Discovery and Invention
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
India’s First Railway
The opening of the Bombay to Thane line was the real beginning of British India.

AT 3.30pm on April 16th, 1853, as the band played ‘God Save the Queen’, fourteen railway carriages carrying four hundred VIPs jolted, and left Bombay for Thane. It was the opening day of the Great Indian Peninsular Railway, India’s first passenger-carrying line, and ahead were twenty-one miles of 5'6" track, which the triple-headed train gobbled up in forty-five minutes.

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No. 10
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Polywords (185)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Grey
Added on Thursday February 15th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.

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Today in History
1771 Lord Mansfield sets Thomas Lewis at liberty
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N.L. Clay
Beware those who encourage ordinary people to be content with clumsy, SMS-style English.
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(12th century)
A bird of prey shattered the peace of St Cuthbert’s island, and was taught an unforgettable lesson.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)
How do we get the help of millions of people we don’t know? Only by trade.
How appropriate that the comic opera ‘Patience’ should introduce the world to the results of thirty years of labour.
James, brother of John the Evangelist, was executed for his faith by a close friend of the Emperor Caligula.

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History (416)
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Doublets (34)
Railways (24)
Triplets (23)
Stuart Era (18)
India (14)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Ring’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘brainy fellow’ (7 letters), and ‘drink’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FALL and finish with RISE.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.