Back to the Home Page
Entries tagged as
Georgian Era (92)

Related Tags for Georgian Era...

1 of 16
1
Buy British
Music: Malcolm Arnold
A nation with its own laws and a strong sense of shared cultural identity makes good economic sense.

EVERY individual is continually exerting himself to find out the most advantageous employment for whatever capital he can command. It is his own advantage, indeed, and not that of the society, which he has in view. But the study of his own advantage naturally, or rather necessarily, leads him to prefer that employment which is most advantageous to the society.

Continue reading

Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Pretty. Quite. Rather.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Trade. View. Profit.

Use together in one sentence: Trust. Support. Industry.

More games: Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

More like this

Caught in the Net
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
A distinguished critic tries to trick Dr Johnson into an honest opinion, which was neither necessary nor very rewarding.

AT this time the controversy concerning the pieces published by Mr James Macpherson, as translations of Ossian, was at its height. Johnson had all along denied their authenticity; and, what was still more provoking to their admirers, maintained that they had no merit.

Continue reading

Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Its. It’s.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Lead. Book. Know.

Use together in one sentence: Some. Reply. Woman.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Big Spenders
Music: Thomas Linley the Younger
Adam Smith warns that politicians are the last people who should lecture the public about how to run their affairs.

GREAT nations are never impoverished by private, though they sometimes are by public prodigality and misconduct. The whole, or almost the whole public revenue is, in most countries, employed in maintaining unproductive hands.

Continue reading

Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Though. Through.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Man. Ruin. Court.

Use together in one sentence: Well. Revenue. Spendthrift.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

More like this

Kanguru!
Music: James Hook
James Cook describes his first sight of a beloved Australian icon.

I SAW myself this morning, a little way from the ship, one of the animals before spoke of; it was of a light mouse colour and the full size of a greyhound, and shaped in every respect like one, with a long tail, which it carried like a greyhound; in short, I should have taken it for a wild dog but for its walking or running, in which it jumped like a hare or deer.

Continue reading

Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Me. Myself. I.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Respect. Ship. Sort.

Use together in one sentence: Long. Sort. Which.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

More like this

Mary Anning
Music: Sophia Giustani Dussek
A twelve-year-old girl from Lyme Regis made a historic discovery while selling seashells to tourists.

IN 1811, twelve-year-old Mary Anning pieced together a fossilised skeleton from the limestone cliffs of Lyme Regis in Dorset. It was very different from the usual ammonite and belemnite shells that she and her brother sold to tourists, and it netted them £23, a welcome windfall following the death of their father Richard the previous year.

Continue reading

Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Shop. Buy. Sell.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Draw. Find. Supply.

Use together in one sentence: Kind. Dragon. As.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Why England’s ‘Revolution’ was Glorious
Music: Henry Purcell
Edmund Burke argues that England’s ‘revolution’ of 1688 worked because we changed the Government, not the Constitution.

IN truth, the circumstances of our revolution (as it is called) and that of France, are just the reverse of each other in almost every particular, and in the whole spirit of the transaction.

With us it was the case of a legal monarch attempting arbitrary power — in France it is the case of an arbitrary monarch, beginning, from whatever cause, to legalize his authority.

Continue reading

Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Raise. Rise. Arise.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Know. Lie. Attempt.

Use together in one sentence: Or. Our. Begin.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.