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The Ashes of English Cricket
Music: Percy Grainger
How the cricketing rivalry between England and Australia got its name.

IN 1882, a cricket team representing Australia defeated England by just seven runs in a match at the Oval in London, the first time Australia had beaten England on home soil.

The Sporting Times mourned the death of English cricket in a tongue-in-cheek Obituary, which ran:

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Ally. Friend. Confederate.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Match. Group. Fight.

Use together in one sentence: Represent. Cricket. Present.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Rugby League
Music: George Hespe
The less glamorous code of Rugby football, but the best for sheer speed and strength.

THE game of Rugby football developed at a Public school in the Warwickshire town of Rugby, early in the Victorian era. Soon it had spread across England, and competitions were organised by the Rugby Football Union, which insisted that players should be strictly amateur.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Dress. Sport. Wear.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Code. Spread. Sport.

Use together in one sentence: Team. Speed. So.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Rebel Rugby
Music: Eric Ball
The Nazi-collaborating Vichy government in France paid Rugby League the supreme compliment: they banned it.

IN 1940, Paris fell to the invading German army. Parts of France which were not actually occupied came under the authority of an extremely unpopular puppet government sympathetic to Nazi Germany, based in Vichy.

The influential men in Vichy were enthusiasts of the English sport of Rugby, because (they said) they admired its noble amateur code.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Dress. Sport. Wear.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Code. Fall. Manufacture.

Use together in one sentence: Still. Town. League.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Ranji
Music: Frank Bridge
A young Indian student from Cambridge was selected for England’s cricket team after public pressure.

IN June 1896, the British cricketing public were grumbling about the omission of a gifted Sussex batsmen from the first Test against Australia. The issue was eligibility, as he was an Indian national, K.S. Ranjitsinhji.

But George Trott, Australia’s big-hearted captain, rubber-stamped Ranjitsinhji’s appearance in the second Test, where ‘Ranji’ repaid him by battering his bowlers around Old Trafford.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Each. Both.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Score. Light. Guard.

Use together in one sentence: Crowd. Issue. College.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Max Woosnam
Music: Sir Hubert Parry
Max fully deserves his reputation as England’s greatest all-round sportsman.

THE oddest of Max Woosnam’s many sporting achievements must be defeating Charlie Chaplin at table tennis, wielding only a butter knife. His more conventional sporting career began with cricket at Winchester College, and a century against the MCC for Public Schools.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Tour. Visit.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Cup. Campaign. Spirit.

Use together in one sentence: After. Volunteer. Pick up.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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How Britain Brought Football to Chile
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
British expats in Valparaíso kicked off the Chilean passion for soccer.

DAVID Foxley Newton founded a football club in Cerro Alegre, Valparaíso, in 1909, which he named ‘Everton’ after the prestigious team from Liverpool back home.

Newton’s forebears had moved to Chile after Britain established a trading base in Valparaíso in 1826, and other British-heritage Chileans introduced football there shortly before the civil war of 1891.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Start. Startle.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Meet. Base. War.

Use together in one sentence: Help. Other. Body.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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