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Arthur MacPherson
Music: Frank Bridge
MacPherson’s tireless afforts to promote Russian sport earned him a unique Imperial honour, and the enmity of the Communists.

ARTHUR MacPherson’s grandfather, Murdoch, had moved from Perth to St Petersburg in the 1830s. But where Murdoch’s business was shipyards, Arthur was an investor, timber merchant, and sports promoter.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Later. Latter.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Kill. Draw. Play.

Use together in one sentence: Favour. Imperial. Business.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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‘My English Joy’
Music: Sir William Sterndale Bennett
In 1837 William Sterndale Bennett, then regarded as England’s most exciting young composer, made history in quite another... field.

WELL, I’m off on Monday. Beginning to pay my visits p.p.c.. Count Reuss is gone away to Kreutz. Called yesterday on Madame von Goethe, dined with Benecke, and played at Cricket with some Englishmen, which made the Germans stare very much, as they never saw the game before — we had English bats and balls.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Each. Every. All.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Place. Make. Spring.

Use together in one sentence: Cricket. Own. Spring.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

A Many-Chorded Lyre
Music: Jan Ladislav Dussek
Stylish batting in cricket is about variety, invention and frankly anything that works, and we have Dr W.G. Grace to thank for it.

“BEFORE W. G. batsmen were of two kinds, — a batsman played a forward game or he played a back game. Each player, too, seems to have made a specialty of some particular stroke. The criterion of style was, as it were, a certain mixed method of play. It was bad cricket to hit a straight ball; as for pulling a slow long-hop, it was regarded as immoral.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Each. Both.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Fine. Make. String.

Use together in one sentence: Play. Introduce. Other.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Hooked
Music: Malcolm Arnold
The great British public leaves a German tourist speechless during a county match at the Oval in London.

“TO begin with, I was much astounded at the enormous seating area of the ground, and at the huge crowd that was assembled to watch eleven men from Nottingham play at bat and ball against eleven men of Surrey.”

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Obscene. Obscure.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Ring. Seat. Spot.

Use together in one sentence: Crowd. Anyone. Many.

More games: Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Aspden Cup
Music: John Field
British factory workers started a historic three-cornered league in the Russian city of St Petersburg.

IN 1879, British expatriates formed Russia’s first football team, the St Petersburg Football Club, and started playing matches against the crews of visiting ships. Soon three new teams, largely recruited from among the labourers and sports-mad administrators of local textile mills, were vying for the Aspden Cup, sponsored by English entrepreneur Thomas Aspden.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Mislead. Mislay. Lose.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Crew. Match. Break.

Use together in one sentence: Champion. Proud. Which.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Rugby League
Music: George Hespe
The less glamorous code of Rugby football, but the best for sheer speed and strength.

THE game of Rugby football developed at a Public school in the Warwickshire town of Rugby, early in the Victorian era. Soon it had spread across England, and competitions were organised by the Rugby Football Union, which insisted that players should be strictly amateur.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Popular. Populous.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Find. Demand. Pay.

Use together in one sentence: Find. First. Strictly.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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