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Charles I and his Parliament
Music: Orlando Gibbons
Charles took his rights and duties as a King with religious seriousness, but Parliament’s sense of both right and duty was just as strong.

IN 1625, Charles I inherited a kingdom torn apart by competing religious convictions and hatreds.

A century before, Henry VIII, chafing at political interference from Rome, had taken control of the English Church and blended its traditions with fashionably Protestant ideas from Switzerland.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Service. Surface.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: War. Book. Charge.

Use together in one sentence: Book. Service. Century.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Firstborn Liberty
Music: Orlando Gibbons
John Milton (of ‘Paradise Lost’ fame) urged Parliament not to fall into bad old habits of censorship, whatever their fears may be.

IF it be desired to know the immediate cause of all this free writing and free speaking, there cannot be assigned a truer than your own mild and free and humane government. It is the liberty, Lords and Commons, which your own valorous and happy counsels have purchased us, liberty which is the nurse of all great wits.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Your. You’re.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Influence. Father. Desire.

Use together in one sentence: According. Father. Rarefy.

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Interregnum
Music: John Playford
When Parliament overthrew the capricious tyranny of Charles I, it discovered an uncomfortable truth about power.

ON 1642, the English Parliament’s dispute with King Charles I over the extent of his powers came to civil war. Westminster’s army proved the better, and at last, seven years later, Colonel Thomas Pride led a coup, escorting the King’s supporters from the Commons so that the remainder – the ‘Rump’ Parliament — could more conveniently convict him of treason.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Civil. Civilian.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Settle. Hand. Break.

Use together in one sentence: Which. Appoint. Remain.

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The Servants of One Master
Some people are not more equal than others, nor are they entitled to more liberty.

THE state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Who. Which. That.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Share. Reason. Make.

Use together in one sentence: Use. Mankind. Equal.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Last Days of Charles II
Music: Henry Purcell
James calls Fr Huddleston to his brother’s deathbed, ready for a most delicate task.

IT was, they said, not unusual for Chiffinch, Charles’s confidential servant, to bring certain charming visitors up the back stairs to his master’s bedroom. Now the King lay upon his deathbed, however, the visitor was of another kind.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Civil. Civilian.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Lay. Search. Water.

Use together in one sentence: To one’s attention. Who. Bring.

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The Great Fire of London
A four-day fire in September 1666 swept the capital, and King Charles II played a heroic part as a firefighter.

THE Great Fire of London began in a bakery on Pudding Lane, near London Bridge, on September 2nd 1666.

With a strong east wind fanning the flames from house to house (one could shake hands across the street from some upper-storey windows), soon the fire was out of control.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Circular. Round.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Wind. Shake. Pass.

Use together in one sentence: Fan the flames. House. King.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Stuart Era (11) History (328)