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Extracts from Literature (75)

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The Knight and the Outlaw
Music: John Jenkins
A mysterious knight and an equally mysterious outlaw agree to preserve one another’s incognito.

“SIR Knight,” said the Outlaw, “we have each our secret. You are welcome to form your judgment of me, and I may use my conjectures touching you, though neither of our shafts may hit the mark they are shot at. But as I do not pray to be admitted into your mystery, be not offended that I preserve my own.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Appraise. Apprise. Praise.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Hold. Mark. Do.

Use together in one sentence: Perform. Secre. Which.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Caught in the Net
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
A distinguished critic tries to trick Dr Johnson into an honest opinion, which was neither necessary nor very rewarding.

AT this time the controversy concerning the pieces published by Mr James Macpherson, as translations of Ossian, was at its height. Johnson had all along denied their authenticity; and, what was still more provoking to their admirers, maintained that they had no merit.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Broadcast. Publish.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Talk. Lead. Book.

Use together in one sentence: This. Provoke. Sorry.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

A Solemn Duty
Music: Joseph Boulogne Chavalier de Saint Georges
Monsieur St Aubert falls seriously ill on a walking tour with his daughter Emily, and before the end asks an unexpected favour.

“HEAR, then, what I am going to tell you. The closet, which adjoins my chamber at La Vallee, has a sliding board in the floor. You will know it by a remarkable knot in the wood, and by its being the next board, except one, to the wainscot, which fronts the door.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Enjoin. Enjoy. Adjoin.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Press. Know. Distance.

Use together in one sentence: Knot. Way. Speak.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The (Fairly) Honest Lawyer
Music: Joseph Boulogne Chavalier de Saint Georges
Andre-Louis Moreau lives for vengeance on the master swordsman who killed his friend.

“MY enemy is a swordsman of great strength — the best blade in the province, if not the best blade in France. I thought I would come to Paris to learn something of the art, and then go back and kill him. You see, I have not the means to take lessons otherwise.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Enemy. Enmity.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Fill. Laugh. Wait.

Use together in one sentence: Take. Which. Best.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Sneeze of History
Music: Alexei Fyodorovich Lvov
It was the opinion of Leo Tolstoy that even Napoleon was never master of his own destiny.

MANY historians say that the French did not win the battle of Borodino because Napoleon had a cold, and that if he had not had a cold the orders he gave before and during the battle would have been still more full of genius and Russia would have been lost and the face of the world have been changed.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Will. Would.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Shape. Go. Order.

Use together in one sentence: Waterproof. Depend. Might.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Pure Selfishness
Music: Nikolai Medtner
The brilliant but dangerously obsessive Dr Griffin decides that ‘the end justifies the means’.

“TO do such a thing would be to transcend magic. And I beheld a magnificent vision of all that invisibility might mean to a man — the mystery, the power, the freedom. Drawbacks I saw none. And I, a shabby, poverty-struck, hemmed-in demonstrator, teaching fools in a provincial college, might suddenly become — this.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Learn. Teach.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Show. Shoot. See.

Use together in one sentence: Every. Provincial. Himself.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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