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Extracts from Literature (63)

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Well Out Of It
Music: Muzio Clementi
Anne Elliot is mortified to hear Frederick Wentworth’s opinion of her, but manages to find comfort in his words.

“CAPTAIN Wentworth is not very gallant by you, Anne, though he was so attentive to me. Henrietta asked him what he thought of you, when they went away, and he said, ‘You were so altered he should not have known you again.’”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Acknowledge. Recognise. Know.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Look. Respect. Make.

Use together in one sentence: Way. Knowledge. Open.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Education of the Heart
Music: Johann Christian Bach
For Jane Austen, the best education a father can give to his child is to befriend her.

TOO late he became aware how unfavourable to the character of any young people must be the totally opposite treatment which Maria and Julia had been always experiencing at home, where the excessive indulgence and flattery of their aunt had been continually contrasted with his own severity.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Compare. Contrast.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Experience. Mean. Cost.

Use together in one sentence: All. Direct. Unfavourable.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Sense and Sensitivity
Music: John Field
Jane Austen wrote as a Christian, but all the better for doing so unobtrusively.

MISS Austin has the merit (in our judgment most essential) of being evidently a Christian writer: a merit which is much enhanced, both on the score of good taste, and of practical utility, by her religion being not at all obtrusive.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Practical. Practicable.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Call. Book. Score.

Use together in one sentence: Subject. Aside. Good.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Knight and the Outlaw
Music: John Jenkins
A mysterious knight and an equally mysterious outlaw agree to preserve one another’s incognito.

“SIR Knight,” said the Outlaw, “we have each our secret. You are welcome to form your judgment of me, and I may use my conjectures touching you, though neither of our shafts may hit the mark they are shot at. But as I do not pray to be admitted into your mystery, be not offended that I preserve my own.”

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Colliery. Mine.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Form. Part. Well.

Use together in one sentence: May. Present. Honour.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Mr Ivery Gets Away
Music: Camille Saint-Saens
Richard Hannay tracks a German spy down to a French château, but Hannay’s sense of fair play gives his enemy a chance.

‘HULLO, Mr Ivery,’ I said. ‘This is an odd place to meet again!’

In his amazement he fell back a step, while his hungry eyes took in my face. There was no mistake about the recognition. I saw something I had seen once before in him, and that was fear. Out went the light and he sprang for the door.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: See. Notice. Watch.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Use. Place. Pass.

Use together in one sentence: Back. Rotten. Fall.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Pangur Bán
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
A 9th century Irish monk scribbled some verses about a beloved cat into his copy book.

I, AND Pangur Bán —
each doing what he does best:
his mind on the hunt,
mine on my own pursuits.

I love, better than fame, relaxing
with my texts, in painstaking study;
Pangur Bán does not envy me that:
he loves his own childish craft.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Childish. Childlike.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Test. Mind. Hold.

Use together in one sentence: Hold. Or. Us.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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