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‘If...’
Music: Sir Hubert Parry
A reflection on what builds real character

IF you can keep your head when all about youAre losing theirs and blaming it on you,If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,But make allowance for their doubting too;If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Unless. Except.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Look. Serve. Count.

Use together in one sentence: Except. Lose one’s head. Heart.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

‘The Overland Mail’
Music: Charles Villiers Stanford
A tribute to the postal workers of British India, and to the kind of empire they helped to build.

IN the name of the Empress of India, make way,
O Lords of the Jungle wherever you roam,
The woods are astir at the close of the day—
We exiles are waiting for letters from Home—
Let the robber retreat; let the tiger turn tail,
In the name of the Empress the Overland-Mail!

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Hear. Attend. Listen.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Swim. Bill. Mouth.

Use together in one sentence: Scuffle. Robber. Turn.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

The Nightingale and the Glow Worm
Music: George Frideric Handel
A kind of Aesop’s Fable in verse, about mutual respect among those with different talents.

A NIGHTINGALE, that all day long
Had cheered the village with his song,
Nor yet at eve his note suspended,
Nor yet when eventide was ended,
Began to feel, as well he might,
The keen demands of appetite

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Will. Would.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Demand. Shine. Note.

Use together in one sentence: Abhor. Beautify. Minstrel.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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‘Recessional’
Music: George Frideric Handel
A heartfelt plea for humility at the height of Britain’s Empire.

GOD of our fathers, known of old —
Lord of our far-flung battle-line —
Beneath whose awful Hand we hold
Dominion over palm and pine —
Lord God of Hosts, be with us yet,
Lest we forget — lest we forget!

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Loose. Loosen. Lose.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Guard. Hand. Stand.

Use together in one sentence: Whose. Far-flung. Word.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Ring out the Old, Ring in the New
Music: Albert Ketèlbey
For Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Christmas was a time to let the dead past bury its dead.

RING out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
The flying cloud, the frosty light:
The year is dying in the night;
Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.

Ring out the want, the care, the sin,
The faithless coldness of the times;
Ring out, ring out my mournful rhymes,
But ring the fuller minstrel in.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Lamp. Light. Torch.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Man. Care. War.

Use together in one sentence: Year. Land. Fly.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Christmas Bells
Music: Ralph Vaughan Williams
The sounds of an English country Christmas helped Tennyson in his deep mourning for an old friend.

THE time draws near the birth of Christ:
The moon is hid; the night is still;
The Christmas bells from hill to hill
Answer each other in the mist.

Each voice four changes on the wind,
That now dilate, and now decrease,
Peace and goodwill, goodwill and peace,
Peace and goodwill, to all mankind.

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Word Play

Adapted from textbooks used in Grammar Schools and Secondary Moderns from the 1920s to the 1960s.

Distinguish using sentences: Peace. Truce.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Hold. Spirit. Bell.

Use together in one sentence: Life. Time. Boy.

More games: Précis. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.