THIS page provides hundreds of example sentences taken from English literature, illustrating the use of various words.

‘Come’ as a verb

Below are some examples of sentences from classic literature using the word ‘Come’ as a verb.

1

“Let the child who broke her slate come forward!”

From ‘Jane Eyre’, by Charlotte Brontë.

2

“I came for the express purpose of seeing Mr Windsor.”

From ‘Psmith, Journalist’, by P.G. Wodehouse.

3

“But why were you not there, Edward? — Why did you not come?”

From ‘Sense and Sensibility’, by Jane Austen.

4

Come into the garden, and look at the moon through my telescope.”

From ‘Men of Invention and Industry’, by Samuel Smiles.

5

“When she first came, I meant to save her from misery like mine.”

From ‘Great Expectations’, by Charles Dickens.

6

I felt my breath come quicker in my strong desire to get something out of [him].

From ‘Great Expectations’, by Charles Dickens.

7

“Why did you pick him?”
“Because he was handy and would come cheap.”

From ‘The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

8

“We should be laughed out of court if we came with such a story and such evidence.”

From ‘The Hound of the Baskervilles’, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

9

I invite you all to come up to the house and visit Mrs Poole’s patient, and my wife!

From ‘Jane Eyre’, by Charlotte Brontë.

10

“Sir Thomas is to achieve many mighty things when he comes home,” said Mary, after a pause.

From ‘Mansfield Park’, by Jane Austen.

11

“Not yet,” replied Jane. “But now that my dear uncle is come, I hope everything will be well.”

From ‘Pride and Prejudice’, by Jane Austen.

12

“Go to him, Elinor,” she cried, as soon as she could speak, “and force him to come to me.”

From ‘Sense and Sensibility’, by Jane Austen.

13

Mr Bingley and his sisters came to give their personal invitation for the long-expected ball at Netherfield.

From ‘Pride and Prejudice’, by Jane Austen.

14

He saw her concern, and coming to her, took her hand, pressed it, and kissed it with grateful respect.

From ‘Sense and Sensibility’, by Jane Austen.

15

“What we pay rates and taxes for I don’t know, when any ruffian can come in and break one’s goods.”

From ‘The Return of Sherlock Holmes’, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

16

If anything important had to be done, we used to send for foreigners to come and teach us how to do it.

From ‘Men of Invention and Industry’, by Samuel Smiles.

17

My tongue was loosened at that. “No accident!” I told him. “When she came to this place, she came weary of her life, to end it here.”

From ‘The Moonstone’, by Wilkie Collins.

18

The third night came clear and cold, with a touch in the air like frost, and a northerly wind that blew the clouds away and made the stars bright.

From ‘Kidnapped!’, by Robert Louis Stevenson.

19

“I had,” said he, “come to an entirely erroneous conclusion which shows, my dear Watson, how dangerous it always is to reason from insufficient data.”

From ‘The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes’, by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Picture: These six steam locomotives were special guests of the Threkeld Quarry and Mining Museum, near Keswick in Cumbria, for its steam gala in 2015. © Chris Allen, Geograph. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0. By Peter Trimming, Geograph. Licence: CC-BY-SA 2.0.
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“I never read novels; I have something else to do.”

From ‘Northanger Abbey’, by Jane Austen.

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