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Nos 21 to 30
1 2 3 4 5 67
2 two-part story
Francesco Geminiani
Liberty and Prosperity
The Empire of Enterprise
Adam Smith credited the British Empire’s success not to the policy of her Government, but to the character of her people.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

THE policy of Europe has very little to boast of, either in the original establishment, or, so far as concerns their internal government, in the subsequent prosperity of the colonies of America.

The conquest of Mexico was the project, not of the council of Spain, but of a governor of Cuba; and it was effectuated by the spirit of the bold adventurer to whom it was entrusted.

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No. 21
Francesco Geminiani
Liberty and Prosperity
Folly and Freedom
Britain’s colonies were founded to supply her Government with gold, but instead they supplied her people with liberty.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

FOLLY and injustice seem to have been the principles which presided over and directed the first project of establishing those colonies; the folly of hunting after gold and silver mines, and the injustice of coveting the possession of a country whose harmless natives, far from having ever injured the people of Europe, had received the first adventurers with every mark of kindness and hospitality.

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No. 22
John Garth
Georgian Era
King George III (1760-1820)
Portrait of a Lady
Edmund Burke takes time off from campaigning for liberty to reflect on the delights of captivity.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)

SHE has a face that just raises your attention at first sight; it grows on you every moment, and you wonder it did no more than raise your attention at first.

Her eyes have a mild light, but they awe you when she pleases; they command, like a good man out of office, not by authority, but by virtue.

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No. 23
Gustav Holst
Modern History
King George IV (1820-1830)
The Power of Balance
George Canning warned the Commons to be very careful about their plans for reform.
By George Canning MP
(1770-1827)

MY lot is cast under the British monarchy. Under that I have lived, — under that I have seen my country flourish, — under that I have seen it enjoy as great a share of prosperity, of happiness, and of glory as I believe any modification of human society to be capable of bestowing.

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No. 24
George Frideric Handel
Extracts from Literature
At a Solemn Musick
John Milton shows his appreciation for noble words and music in uplifting harmony.
By John Milton
(1632-1704)

BLEST pair of Sirens, pledges of Heav’ns joy,
Sphear-born harmonious Sisters, Voice, and Vers,
Wed your divine sounds, and mixt power employ
Dead things with inbreath’d sense able to pierce,
And to our high-rais’d phantasie present,
That undisturbed Song of pure concent,
Ay sung before the saphire-colour’d throne
To him that sits theron.

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No. 25
William Crotch
International Relations
King George IV (1820-1830)
Let Europe’s Peoples Go!
George Canning begged Britain not to help Europe’s Great Powers deny small states their right to independence.
By George Canning MP
(1770-1827)

GENTLEMEN, there is (disguise it how we may) a struggle going on, — in some countries an open, and in some a tacit struggle, between the principles of monarchy and democracy. God be praised, that in that struggle we have not any part to take. God be praised, that we have long ago arrived at all the blessings that are to be derived from that which alone can end such a struggle beneficially, — a compromise and intermixture of those conflicting principles.

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No. 26
2 two-part story
James Hook
Extracts from Literature
An Easy Life
Mr Easy believes he has missed out on fatherhood, and having nothing else to do, turns to political campaigning.
By Frederick Marryat
(1792-1848)

MR Nicodemus Easy was a gentleman who lived down in Hampshire; he was a married man, and in very easy circumstances. Most couples find it very easy to have a family, but not always quite so easy to maintain them. Mr Easy was not at all uneasy on the latter score, as he had no children; but he was anxious to have them, as most people covet what they cannot obtain.

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No. 27
Gustav Holst
Tales from the Bible
Say ‘Shibboleth!’
Jephthah’s sentries at the crossings of Jordan devise a fool-proof way to tell friend from foe.

JEPHTHAH lived in Gilead on the east bank of the Jordan. When the Kingdom of Ammon, which lay still further east, made an assault on Israel, he emerged as a great warrior. But the elders of the tribe of Ephraim resented Gilead going it alone, as they saw it, and though Jephthah reminded them that they had ignored his pleas for help, still they threatened to destroy his home and family. Soon Gilead and Ephraim were at war.

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No. 28
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel
Tales from the Bible
Gideon’s Fleece
Gideon is chosen by God to save Israel from the Midianites, but doubts his fitness for the task.

NOT long after the Israelites escaped from Egypt and settled in Canaan, their new home was invaded by the Kingdom of Midian. For seven years their crops and herds were destroyed or seized by the invaders, but the greatest indignity they suffered was that altars and groves sacred to Baal, the Midianites’ imaginary god, were set up on their lands, and there was just such a grove on the lands of Joash.

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No. 29
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel
Tales from the Bible
Gideon Recruits an Army
Gideon prepares to drive the Midianites out of Israel, but first he has to make it a fair fight.

BUT Gideon’s father Joash defied the city councillors. He told them that if Baal felt offended, he must fight his own wars; Joash would not give up his son. The row escalated, and before long a Midianite army had encamped in the valley of Jezreel, and Gideon had gathered loyal men from Manasseh and other neighbouring tribes, ready for battle.

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No. 30
Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Jonathan Swift
(1667-1745)
Lemuel Gulliver finds that the people of Balnibarbi just don’t appreciate their hardworking academics.
In Irish princess fled to Cumbria to escape the Vikings, clutching her precious silver bracelet.
By William Shakespeare
(1564-1616)
Viola tries to tell Orsino, Duke of Illyria, that his beloved Olivia is not the only woman deserving of his attention.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)
The blessing of trade free from political interference was one of most important insights in British, indeed world history.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)
Sir Mulberry Hawk’s coarse conduct towards Kate Nickleby has awoken a spark of decency in Lord Frederick Verisopht.

A to Z Index

Top Topics
History (406)
Polywords (183)
Georgian Era (112)
Fiction (84)
Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Triplets (23)
Railways (23)
Stuart Era (17)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘News’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘bashful’ (3), and ‘an open area of shrubs and coarse grass’ (5)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with CHIP and finish with PUTT.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.