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Nos 431 to 440
Edward Elgar
Modern History
King Edward VII (1901-1910)
The Man who Made the Headlines
William Stead conceived modern print journalism in the belief that newspapers could change the world.

WHEN William Stead became editor of ‘The Northern Echo’ in 1871, he was just 22 and the youngest newspaper-editor in the country.

He exploited Darlington’s railway connections to expand the newspaper’s circulation, helping William Gladstone’s Liberal Party to power in 1880.

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No. 431
2 two-part story
Greek Traditional Dance and George Frideric Handel
Classical History
Alcibiades
In the populist democracy of 5th-century BC Athens, heroes fell as quickly as they rose.

WHILE Nicias was negotiating a delicate truce with Sparta, Alcibiades, a rival in the Athens Assembly, secretly met the Spartan envoys.

He urged them to temper their demands, promising to be their inside man. In the Assembly, however, he double-crossed them, mocking their modest terms, and casting himself as the strong leader Athens craved.

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No. 432
Ralph Vaughan Williams
Lives of the Saints
St David of Wales
The popular monk was elected as bishop of Menevia in Wales in 550.

DEWI Sant, as the Welsh call him, was a Christian monk who founded twelve new monasteries in the largely pagan society of Brittany (in northern France), the West Country, and Wales.

David lived as his monks did, drinking only water, and eating only bread, herbs and vegetables.

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No. 433
2 two-part story
Sir Hubert Parry
Classical History
Pericles and the Fickle Public of Athens
The leader of 5th-century BC Athens lavished public money on the city and its adoring citizens.

EVER since the reforms of Solon, Athenian politics had been moving towards greater participation for ordinary people.

Some such as Cimon, veteran of Salamis, thought this had gone far enough; but early in the 460s Ephialtes launched an audacious bid to cut Cimon and the Areopagus, the aristocratic council of Athens, down to size.

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No. 434
Francesco Geminiani
British Myths and Legends
The Knight, the Lady, and the Forest of Sorrow
A little fable of encouragement for all the suffering.
Based on a fable by Jerome K. Jerome
(1859-1927)

ONCE upon a time, a company of knights rode upon the marches of a thick forest. Night lay upon it, and whoever turned aside from that path was held fast in its thorny briars, and lost in its darkness.

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No. 435
John Field
Discovery and Invention
King William IV (1830-1837)
How the British Invented Cool
Michael Faraday showed that gases could be compressed and evaporated to preserve food and make ice.

JANE Austen enjoyed eating ices and sipping French wine at her wealthy brother’s Godmersham home, courtesy of his ice-house, a brick-lined dome sunk into the ground, in which ice could remain frozen for years.

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No. 436
Muzio Clementi and Sir Hubert Parry
Extracts from Literature
‘Not one more!’
The prospect of facing daunting odds made his cousin quail, but Henry acted like a true King.
By William Shakespeare
(1564-1616)

O DO not wish one more!
Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
Let him depart.

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No. 437
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Modern History
The Crimean War
It was the first war to be covered by embedded correspondents, and the public did not like what they read.

ON 31st May, 1853, Tsar Nicholas I of Russia dispatched troops to Moldavia and Wallachia, long a matter of dispute with the Ottoman Empire, ostensibly to bolster Orthodox Christians there.

After the Russians sank Turkish ships at Sinope on the Black Sea, Britain, Austria and France, fearing Russian expansion into the West, declared war on 28th March, 1854.

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No. 438
Sir Arthur Sullivan
Aesop of Samos
Belling the Cat
A council of mice comes up with a plan to outsmart the Cat, but volunteers are a bit thin on the ground.
Based on a fable by
Aesop of Samos

LONG ago, the Mice gathered in anxious council to debate how they could best defend themselves against their great enemy, the Cat.

After a great deal of excited squeaking, one Mouse addressed the assembly with statesmanlike gravity.

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No. 439
Gustav Holst
Classical History
The Battle of Marathon
Remembered as the inspiration of the famous Olympic road race, but much more important than that.

TO King Darius I of Persia, Greece was a prize like no other: a prosperous centre of trade, of the arts, of civilisation itself.

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No. 440
Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
George Stephenson argued that his steam engines were solar-powered.
William is Cumbria’s very own blend of Robin Hood and William Tell - with a happy ending, too.
The young Roman Emperor Theophilus backed away from marriage to the formidable Cassiani, but he could not forget her.
In a translation from the Authorised Version of the Bible, published in 1611, St Mark recounts the discovery of Christ’s empty tomb.
By Cynewulf
(8th century)
The eighth-century English bishop and poet Cynewulf takes us to the threshold of God’s holy city, and gives us a choice.

A to Z Index

Top Topics
History (406)
Polywords (183)
Georgian Era (111)
Fiction (84)
Quickwords (46)
Doublets (34)
Railways (23)
Triplets (23)
Stuart Era (17)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Eventide’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘rim’ (4 letters), and ‘the Roman name for Chester’ (4 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with SEED and finish with GROW.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.