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Posts tagged Charles Dickens (20)
Nos 11 to 20
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2 two-part story
Louise Farrenc
Extracts from Literature
One Last Question
English lawyer Sydney Carton goes to the guillotine in place of a French aristocrat.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

“WILL you let me ask you one last question? I am very ignorant, and it troubles me — just a little.”

“Tell me what it is.”

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No. 11
Sophia Giustani Dussek
Liberty and Prosperity
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
How Liberating the Slaves also Clothed the Poor
The closure of slave plantations following the Abolition of Slavery Act in 1833 had a curious side-effect.
Based on an article by Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

THE African slaves in the West Indies were usually dressed in a shirt and trousers of striped mattress sacking. As soon as they were emancipated, they wished to dress like their late masters, and Jewish entrepreneurs in London heard of it from their colleagues in the Caribbean. So they hastily washed, mended and exported second-hand clothes to the States, allowing ex-slaves to rival their former owner’s wardrobe for an eighth of the price.

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No. 12
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Extracts from Literature
Mr Snawley Thinks Ahead
Mr Snawley has two stepsons he would like to offload, and Mr Squeers seems just the right person to help him.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

‘EACH boy is required to bring, sir, two suits of clothes, six shirts, six pair of stockings, two nightcaps, two pocket-handkerchiefs, two pair of shoes, two hats, and a razor.’

‘A razor!’ exclaimed Mr. Snawley, as they walked into the next box. ‘What for?’

‘To shave with,’ replied Squeers, in a slow and measured tone.

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No. 13
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
Kate gets a Dressing-Down
Kate Nickleby must bite her lip as she experiences snobbery for the first time.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

SHE was awkward — her hands were cold — dirty — coarse — she could do nothing right; they wondered how Madame Mantalini could have such people about her; requested they might see some other young woman the next time they came; and so forth.

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No. 14
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Anglo-Saxon History
King Alfred the Great (871-899)
Alfred Learns To Read
Even as a child, King Alfred couldn’t resist a challenge.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

AT twelve years old, Alfred had not been taught to read; although, of the sons of King Ethelwulf, he, the youngest, was the favourite.

But he had — as most men who grow up to be great and good are generally found to have had — an excellent mother.

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No. 15
2 two-part story
John Stanley
Mediaeval History
King Henry VI (1422-1461, 1470-1) to King Edward IV (1461-1483)
Richard of York: One Hand on the Throne
The Wars of the Roses pitted two royal houses against each other for the crown of England.
Based on an account by Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

KING Henry VI suffered from periodic insanity, and his Queen, Margaret of Anjou, was the power behind his throne.

Neither was popular. Many people were glad that after capturing the King at St Albans on May 22nd, 1455, Richard, Duke of York, left Margaret no choice but to reinstate him as Lord Protector, governing in Henry’s stead.

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No. 16
John Field
Extracts from Literature
The Insect on the Leaf
Scrooge begs the Spirit of Christmas to tell him what will happen to Tiny Tim.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

“I SEE a vacant seat,” replied the Ghost, “in the poor chimney-corner, and a crutch without an owner, carefully preserved. If these shadows remain unaltered by the Future, none other of my race will find him here. What then? If he be like to die, he had better do it, and decrease the surplus population.”

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No. 17
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Extracts from Literature
‘Please Sir, I Want Some More!’
Oliver was elected as the unwilling spokesman for all the hungry children.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

A COUNCIL was held; lots were cast who should walk up to the master after supper that evening, and ask for more; and it fell to Oliver Twist.

The evening arrived; the boys took their places.

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No. 18
Henry Purcell
Extracts from Literature
Presumption and Innocence
Charles Dickens chastises those who alter the plots of classic tales to push some social agenda of their own.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

IT would be hard to estimate the amount of gentleness and mercy that has made its way among us through these slight channels.

Forbearance, courtesy, consideration for poor and aged, kind treatment of animals, love of nature, abhorrence of tyranny and brute force - many such good things have been first nourished in the child's heart by this powerful aid.

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No. 19
2 two-part story
Muzio Clementi
Stories in Short
The Story of ‘Oliver Twist’
Fate and a vicious professional thief named Fagin conspire to trap orphan Oliver Twist into a life of crime.
Based on the novel by Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

OLIVER TWIST was an orphan from birth, and left in the unsympathetic care of a government Workhouse.

As soon as he was old enough, he was sent to work for an undertaker, a miserable existence from which he escaped by running away to London.

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No. 20
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
An early British king discovers what he is really worth to his daughters.
Young William’s hat caught the eye of Matthew Boulton, and the world was never the same again.
A political rival sends Jason on a hopeless errand, to fetch the golden fleece.
Sometimes it is right to ‘turn a blind eye’.
Pygmalion discovered that prudishness is not the same as purity.

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Polyword ‘Tulip’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘warm covering’ (7 letters), and ‘2,240 lb’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with CHIP and finish with PUTT.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.