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Posts tagged Fiction (84)
Nos 11 to 20
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Ignaz Moscheles
Extracts from Literature
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Train of a Life
In Charles Dickens’s tale set around Mugby Junction, a man sees his life flash by like a ghostly train.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

AS the belated traveller plodded up and down, a shadowy train went by him in the gloom which was no other than the train of a life. From whatsoever intangible deep cutting or dark tunnel it emerged, here it came, unsummoned and unannounced, stealing upon him and passing away into obscurity.

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No. 11
2 two-part story
William Byrd and John Dowland
Stories in Short
Much Ado About Nothing
Don Pedro’s brother John tries to ensure that the course of true love does not run smooth.
Based on the play by William Shakespeare
(1564-1616)

FLUSHED with success in battle, Don Pedro, Prince of Aragon, repaired to Messina in Sicily for a well-earned rest in the house of the Governor, Leonato. With him went two Italian lords, Claudio and Benedick, and his stepbrother, Don John.

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No. 12
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
Wild Goose Chase
Sir Walter Scott warned that schoolchildren must not expect to be entertained all the time.
By Sir Walter Scott
(1771-1832)

THE history of England is now reduced to a game at cards, and the doctrines of arithmetic may, we are assured, be sufficiently acquired by spending a few hours a week at a new and complicated edition of the Royal Game of the Goose.

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No. 13
2 two-part story
Edward Elgar
Extracts from Literature
A Curious Incident
Sherlock Holmes has been engaged to find a missing thoroughbred, but seems more interested in some lame sheep and an idle dog.
By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
(1859-1930)

“I MUST say that I am rather disappointed in our London consultant,” said Colonel Ross, bluntly, as my friend left the room. “I do not see that we are any further than when he came.”

“At least you have his assurance that your horse will run,” said I.

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No. 14
Joseph Boulogne Chavalier de Saint Georges
Extracts from Literature
The (Fairly) Honest Lawyer
Andre-Louis Moreau lives for vengeance on the master swordsman who killed his friend.
By Rafael Sabatini
(1865-1947)

“MY enemy is a swordsman of great strength — the best blade in the province, if not the best blade in France. I thought I would come to Paris to learn something of the art, and then go back and kill him. You see, I have not the means to take lessons otherwise.”

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No. 15
Nikolai Medtner
Extracts from Literature
Pure Selfishness
The brilliant but dangerously obsessive Dr Griffin decides that ‘the end justifies the means’.
By H. G. Wells
(1866-1946)

“TO do such a thing would be to transcend magic. And I beheld a magnificent vision of all that invisibility might mean to a man — the mystery, the power, the freedom. Drawbacks I saw none. And I, a shabby, poverty-struck, hemmed-in demonstrator, teaching fools in a provincial college, might suddenly become — this.”

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No. 16
William Crotch
Extracts from Literature
One False Step
Louisa Musgrove thought she had hit on a sure method of winning Captain Wentworth’s affections.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

THERE was too much wind to make the high part of the new Cobb pleasant for the ladies, and they agreed to get down the steps to the lower, and all were contented to pass quietly and carefully down the steep flight, excepting Louisa; she must be jumped down them by Captain Wentworth.

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No. 17
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Extracts from Literature
The Living Past
High above the roof of the Amazonian rainforest, Professor Challenger sees something that eerily reminds him of home.
By Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
(1859-1930)

“BY George, this must be the trail of the father of all birds!”

If it were indeed a bird — and what animal could leave such a mark? — its foot was so much larger than an ostrich’s that its height upon the same scale must be enormous. Lord John looked eagerly round him and slipped two cartridges into his elephant-gun.

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No. 18
Robert Farnon
Extracts from Literature
Love at First Bite
Sam felt that his epic romance might have started more promisingly.
By P. G. Wodehouse
(1881-1975)

SHE was not the prettiest girl he had ever seen. She was the third prettiest. He had an orderly mind, one capable of classifying and docketing girls. But there was a subtle something about her, a sort of how-shall-one-put-it, which he had never encountered before.

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No. 19
Charles Villiers Stanford
Extracts from Literature
Happy Government
Lady Glencora scolds the Earl of Brentford for political inactivity, but he warns her to be careful what she wishes for.
By Anthony Trollope
(1815-1882)

“WHAT a nice, happy, lazy time you’ve had of it since you’ve been in,” said she to the Earl.

“I hope we have been more happy than lazy,” said the Earl.

“But you’ve done nothing. Mr Palliser has twenty schemes of reform, all mature; but among you you’ve not let him bring in one of them. The Duke and Mr Mildmay and you will break his heart among you.”

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No. 20
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Fulke Greville, Baron Brooke
(1554-1628)
Elizabethan courtier and soldier Sir Philip Sidney shows that a nobleman can also be a gentleman.
Mild-mannered Grace Darling persuaded her father to let her help him rescue the survivors of a shipwreck.
By Richard Cobden
(1804-1865)
It is not politicians and their policies that create wealth, but the hard work and ingenuity of ordinary people.
By Ethel Smyth
(1858-1944)
Composer Ethel Smyth buys a new-fangled ladies’ bicycle, and scandalises the neighbours.
Richard I thought a veteran Crusader and conqueror of Saladin could handle a few French peasants.

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Fiction (84)
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Doublets (34)
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Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Blue’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘satisfied’ (7 letters), and ‘warm and cosy’ (4 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with CHIP and finish with PUTT.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.