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Posts tagged Fiction (84)
Nos 61 to 70
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2 two-part story
Sir Hubert Parry
Stories in Short
The Hound of the Baskervilles
Is an old family legend being used as a cover for a very modern murder?
Based on the novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
(1859-1930)

THE sudden death of Sir Charles Baskerville brought his nephew Henry from Canada to Baskerville Hall, on the edge of Dartmoor.

Rumours that Sir Charles had died of fright on seeing the Baskerville hound, the terror of a family ghost-story going back to the 17th century, Sir Henry brushed aside as legend.

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No. 61
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel and Johann Sebastian Bach
Stories in Short
The Selfish Giant
A giant gets angry when he finds children playing in his garden.
Based on the short story by
Oscar Wilde

ALL the children of the village played in the garden of an empty house, until one day the owner, who was a Giant, came back.

The sight of all those children in his garden made him angry, so he built a stout wall around it, and put up a notice saying ‘Trespassers will be Prosecuted’.

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No. 62
2 two-part story
Felix Mendelssohn and Anthony Collins
Extracts from Literature
The Caucus Race
Alice experiences for herself the very definition of a pointless exercise.
By Lewis Carroll
(1832-1898)

FIRST it marked out a race-course, in a sort of circle, (‘the exact shape doesn’t matter,’ it said,) and then all the party were placed along the course, here and there.

There was no ‘One, two, three, and away,’ but they began running when they liked, and left off when they liked, so that it was not easy to know when the race was over.

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No. 63
Extracts from Literature
‘There is a Tide in the Affairs of Men’
Brutus tells Cassius to act while everything is going his way, or be left with nothing but regrets.
By William Shakespeare
(1564-1616)

THERE is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life
Is bound in shallows, and in miseries.

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No. 64
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
‘The marriage cannot go on!’
The cup of happiness is dashed from Jane Eyre’s lips.
By Charlotte Brontë
(1816-1855)

THE service began. The explanation of the intent of matrimony was gone through; and then the clergyman came a step further forward, and, bending slightly towards Mr. Rochester, went on.

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No. 65
John Stanley
Extracts from Literature
The Peculiar Customs of Lilliput
The people of Lilliput are strangely small, but their ideas are bizarre in a big way.
By Jonathan Swift
(1667-1745)

I SHALL say but little at present of their learning, which, for many ages, has flourished in all its branches among them: but their manner of writing is very peculiar, being neither from the left to the right, like the Europeans, nor from the right to the left, like the Arabians, nor from up to down, like the Chinese, but aslant, from one corner of the paper to the other, like ladies in England.

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No. 66
Muzio Clementi
Extracts from Literature
Fanny Comes Home
Fanny Price, eight years after being adopted by her wealthy uncle and aunt, has gone back home for the first time, full of anticipation.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

FANNY was almost stunned. The smallness of the house and thinness of the walls brought everything so close to her, that, added to the fatigue of her journey, and all her recent agitation, she hardly knew how to bear it.

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No. 67
Extracts from Literature
Are Women more faithful than Men?
A touchy subject, especially when your lover is listening in.
By Jane Austen
(1775-1817)

“Oh!” cried Anne eagerly, “I hope I do justice to all that is felt by you, and by those who resemble you. God forbid that I should undervalue the warm and faithful feelings of any of my fellow-creatures! I should deserve utter contempt if I dared to suppose that true attachment and constancy were known only by woman.

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No. 68
2 two-part story
Sir Hubert Parry
Stories in Short
Treasure Island
An excited English gentleman hires a ship for a treasure-hunt, but doesn’t check his crew’s credentials.
Based on the novel by Robert Louis Stevenson
(1850-1894)

AFTER the landlord of the Admiral Benbow inn died, times were hard for his widow and his son Jim.

Otherwise, they would not have put up with their solitary resident, a rough, foul-mouthed seaman calling himself ‘Captain Billy Bones’.

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No. 69
2 two-part story
Sir William Sterndale Bennett and York Bowen
Stories in Short
The Hobbit
Tolkien’s tale of dragons, magic rings and enchanted gold is one of the masterpieces of English literature.
Based on the novel by J.R.R. Tolkien
(1892-1973)

THORIN, a proud king among dwarves, was heir to a kingdom deep beneath the Lonely Mountain, and to the vast treasure within. However, the dragon Smaug was now lying on that treasure, and as warriors were rare, Thorin was looking for a burglar to help him steal it.

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No. 70
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)
King Harold died at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Or did he?
MacPherson’s tireless efforts to promote Russian sport earned him a unique Imperial honour, and the enmity of the Communists.
By Rudyard Kipling
(1865-1936)
A meditation on our instinctive love for the place in which we live.
By Samuel Johnson
(1709-1784)
The great Dr Johnson argues that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.
Lord Armstrong’s home was an Aladdin’s cave of Victorian technology.

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Polyword ‘Seraph’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘a republic in the Pyrenees’ (7 letters), and ‘shallow in sentiment’ (5 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with SWORD and finish with PEACE.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.