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Posts tagged History (406)
Nos 271 to 280
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Charles Villiers Stanford
Lives of the Saints
St Aidan Returns King Penda’s Fire
When Penda tried to burn down Bamburgh Castle, St Aidan turned the pagan King’s own weapons against him.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

A FORTRESS was raised at Bamburgh by Ida, the first King of the coastal Kingdom of Bernicia, in 548. At that time, it was called Dinguoaroy; it was later named Bebbanburgh after Bebba, wife of Ida’s grandson Æthelfrith.

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No. 271
Charles Avison
Modern History
Sharp’s Castle
At Bamburgh, John Sharp organised free healthcare and education, bargain groceries, and the world’s first coastguard service.

BAMBURGH Castle was the property of the Crown until 1610, when its guardians, the Fosters, were granted ownership in recognition of long service. But it was a shadow of its former glory, and to make matters worse, Tom Foster made the two-fold error of getting into debt and backing the Jacobite Rebellion of 1715.

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No. 272
2 two-part story
John Field
Lives of the Saints
St Patrick of Ireland
After escaping from six years as a slave in Ireland, Patrick wanted only one thing: to go back.

AT sixteen, Patrick was abducted from his comfortable home and smuggled across to Ireland, where he was put to work as a shepherd.

He was thus deprived of a Roman education (his father was a Roman citizen and town councillor), but out on the hard hills, Patrick learnt to pray, and to trust in Providence.

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No. 273
Charles Villiers Stanford
Discovery and Invention
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
Cragside: the Home of Modern Living
Lord Armstrong’s home was an Aladdin’s cave of Victorian technology.

CRAGSIDE House was developed over several years by Victorian industrialist William Armstrong, starting in 1863.

A keen naturalist, he planted his land with seven million trees and shrubs, chiefly conifers and rhododendrons, and created what remains one of Europe’s largest rock gardens.

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No. 274
Sir William Sterndale Bennett
Anglo-Saxon History
King Alfred the Great (871-899)
Alfred Learns To Read
Even as a child, King Alfred couldn’t resist a challenge.
By Charles Dickens
(1812-1870)

AT twelve years old, Alfred had not been taught to read; although, of the sons of King Ethelwulf, he, the youngest, was the favourite.

But he had — as most men who grow up to be great and good are generally found to have had — an excellent mother.

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No. 275
2 two-part story
George Frideric Handel
Anglo-Saxon History
Anglo-Saxon Britain (410-1066)
King Edwin and the Hand of Destiny
Forced from his throne and threatened with murder, Edwin makes a curious bargain for his deliverance.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

EDWIN should have inherited the crown of Deira from his father Ælle. Instead, Edwin’s brother-in-law Æthelfrith, King of neighbouring Bernicia, emerged as King of a new and powerful joint kingdom called Northumbria, and Edwin was driven out.

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No. 276
2 two-part story
Byzantine Chant
Lives of the Saints
Caedmon Learns to Sing
A shy and unmusical stable-hand suddenly began to sing wise and moving hymns.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

THE farmhands on the estates of the monastery at Whitby liked a song in the evening, but whenever the harp looked like coming his way, Caedmon would slip out and go to bed in the stables.

On one such occasion, a man appeared in his dreams and greeted him. ‘Caedmon’ he said, ‘sing to me’.

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No. 277
John Playford
Norman Era
King Stephen (1135-1154)
The Tichborne Dole
The strange-but-true story of a Lady Day tradition.

BACK in the twelfth century, as Lady Mabella Tichborne lay dying she asked her husband to give the peasants on his estates a free gift of flour every year on Lady Day.

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No. 278
Edward Elgar
Modern History
King Edward VII (1901-1910)
The Man who Made the Headlines
William Stead conceived modern print journalism in the belief that newspapers could change the world.

WHEN William Stead became editor of ‘The Northern Echo’ in 1871, he was just 22 and the youngest newspaper-editor in the country.

He exploited Darlington’s railway connections to expand the newspaper’s circulation, helping William Gladstone’s Liberal Party to power in 1880.

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No. 279
2 two-part story
Greek Traditional Dance and George Frideric Handel
Classical History
Alcibiades
In the populist democracy of 5th-century BC Athens, heroes fell as quickly as they rose.

WHILE Nicias was negotiating a delicate truce with Sparta, Alcibiades, a rival in the Athens Assembly, secretly met the Spartan envoys.

He urged them to temper their demands, promising to be their inside man. In the Assembly, however, he double-crossed them, mocking their modest terms, and casting himself as the strong leader Athens craved.

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No. 280
Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
The Scots paid a heavy price for honouring their ‘Auld Alliance’ with France.
The young Roman Emperor Theophilus backed away from marriage to the formidable Cassiani, but he could not forget her.
The ruthless diamond magnate who donated his fortune to the education and empowerment of Africans.
Richard Trevithick’s boss hailed the engineer as a genius. Today he’d have been fired. (Oh, and the train was delayed.)
By Queen Victoria of the United Kingdom
(1819-1901)
No religion or race should enjoy special status or protection under British law.

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Polyword ‘Hut’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘street lined with tall buildings or trees’ (6 letters), and ‘shed’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with FULL and finish with STOP.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.