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Posts tagged History (406)
Nos 331 to 340
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George Frideric Handel
Anglo-Saxon History
The Alleluia Victory
How hard-pressed Christians on the Welsh border won a battle without bloodshed.
Based on an account by Saint Bede of Jarrow
(672-735)

EARLY in the 5th century, Christian villagers on the Welsh borders were being harried by pagan Picts and Saxons. And now, just after Easter in the year 429, the little community learnt that an army was on its way to murder them all.

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No. 331
Gioachino Rossini
Greek History
The Third Siege of Missolonghi
The cruelty of the Ottoman Turks so shocked Europe that the tide of opinion turned against them.

FROM 15th April, 1825, to 10th April the following year, the city of Missolonghi near Corinth in Greece was subjected to a pitiless siege by the ruling Ottoman Empire.

It was the third siege suffered by the town, and the most devastating.

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No. 332
Jean-Baptiste Krumpholz
Anglo-Saxon History
Edith and Edward
A King and Queen gentler than the times in which they lived.
Based on an account by Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)

IT was said throughout England that ‘Even as the rose springs from the thorn, so springs Edith from Godwin.’

Ingulf, the Abbot of Croyland, later recalled that when he was a schoolboy, Edith would examine him on his studies, and then having pressed a few coins into his hand, send him to the larder for a treat.

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No. 333
Anglo-Saxon History
King Alfred the Great (871-899)
How Alfred Burnt the Cakes
A popular tale of scorched cakes and a scolded king.
By Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)

ALFRED was only twenty-two years old when he came to the throne, and the kingdom was overrun everywhere with the Danes.

At last he had so very few faithful men left him, that he thought it wise to send them away, and take refuge in the Somersetshire marsh country.

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No. 334
Traditional Greek Song (arr. piano and voice)
Greek History
Byron and Hercules
Lord Byron could not have hoped for a better omen in his support for the oppressed people of Greece.

IN 1815, the poet Lord Byron married Annabella Milbanke in Seaham Hall, County Durham.

In that same year, and in that same town, a small trading ship was launched, named Hercules after the legendary Greek hero.

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No. 335
Johann Baptist Cramer
Anglo-Saxon History
The Hermit of Handbridge
King Harold died at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. Or did he?
By Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)

THERE was much talk of a hermit, who dwelt in a cell not far from the town.

He was seldom seen, his face was deeply scarred, and he had lost his left eye, and nothing was known of his name or history.

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No. 336
Anglo-Saxon History
The Battle of the Winwaed
In 655, the future of England as a Christian nation hung by the slenderest of threads.

KING Penda of Mercia defeated King Edwin of Northumbria at the battle of Hatfield Chase in 633, and then his successor King Oswald at the Battle of Maserfield in 642.

These were heavy blows to the spread of Christianity, which through St Aidan had taken firm root in Northumbria, for Penda was a pagan.

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No. 337
Sir Arthur Sullivan
Discovery and Invention
Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Rewards of ‘Patience’
How appropriate that the comic opera ‘Patience’ should introduce the world to the results of thirty years of labour.

ON December 28, 1881, the D’Oyly Carte Opera company presented ‘Patience’ at the Savoy, their theatre in the Strand. Words were by W. S. Gilbert, music was by Arthur Sullivan.

Lighting was by Joseph Swan, a chemist from Newcastle who had already patented a form of photographic paper that had revolutionised the camera.

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No. 338
Frederic Hymen Cowen
Modern History
The Siege of Khartoum
General Gordon’s death was a sensation and a scandal in its day.

IN 1884, the Sudan was faced with rule by Egypt, then in British hands, or rule by Muhammad Ahmad, the self-proclaimed ‘Mahdi’ of Islam.

Back home in London, Prime Minister William Gladstone sympathised with Muhammad Ahmad, whom he saw as a freedom-fighter.

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No. 339
Frederic Hymen Cowen
Sir Winston S. Churchill
King George V (1910-1936)
The Massacre at Amritsar
After one of the worst outrages in modern British history, Winston Churchill made sure there was no cover-up.

ON 13th April 1919, thousands of Sikhs crowded into the Jallianwala Bagh [i.e. garden, park] in Amritsar, Punjab, on their harvest festival.

The Punjab had become a restless province during the Great War, and London, warned of terrorist ties to Germany and Russian revolutionaries, had imposed a crack-down.

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No. 340
Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
By William Cowper
(1731-1800)
A kind of Aesop’s Fable in verse, about mutual respect among those with different talents.
An Egypt independent of British rule humiliated her old colonial mistress, but began to slide into despotism.
By William Windham MP
(1750-1810)
William Windham MP was appalled at the idea of levying a tax on man’s best friend.
The Church’s campaigns against slavery were boosted by competition for labour after the Black Death.
Based on an account by Charlotte Yonge
(1823-1901)
A Danish soldier in the seventeenth century imposes the severest sentence he can think of.

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Polyword ‘Brine’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘part of a fish’ (3 letters), and ‘heart of the matter’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with PIG and finish with STY.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.