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Posts tagged Georgian Era (112)
Nos 31 to 40
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John Hebden
Modern History
The Battle of Flamborough Head
An American revolutionary harassed British commercial shipping off the Yorkshire coast, with mixed results.

IN September 1779, John Paul Jones, a commander in the American Continental Navy, led a makeshift flotilla of French ships around Scotland and down into the North Sea, harassing commercial shipping as far as Bridlington.

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No. 31
2 two-part story
Jan Ladislav Dussek
Discovery and Invention
The Story of ‘Charlotte Dundas’
The invention of the steamboat was a formidable challenge not just of engineering, but of politics and finance.

THE world’s first steam-powered vessel was demonstrated by the Marquis Claude de Jouffroy, navigating the Doubs river between Besançon and Montbéliard in 1776. Over in America, John Fitch demonstrated a second on the Delaware to members of the United States’ Constitutional Convention, meeting at Philadelphia in 1787.

Brilliant though these innovations were, they were blind alleys both scientifically and commercially.

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No. 32
Cipriani Potter
Liberty and Prosperity
King George III (1760-1820) to Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
Character Witness
A former convict gives his own account of his debt to Thomas Wright, the prisoner’s friend.

“FIVE years ago I was” owns a certain G. J. “in the New Bailey, convicted of felony and sentenced to four months’ imprisonment. When I was discharged from prison, I could get no employment. I went to my old employer to ask him to take me again.

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No. 33
Cipriani Potter
Liberty and Prosperity
King George III (1760-1820) to Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
The Prisoner’s Friend
Thomas Wright never earned more than a foreman’s wage, but he helped hundreds of prisoners back into society.

WHEN Thomas Wright learnt that a fellow employee at the Manchester foundry where he worked was to be sacked just because he was an ex-convict, he put down £20 as a guarantee of the man’s good behaviour. But by the time Wright reached the man’s lodgings, bursting with good news, the poor fellow had packed up and fled.

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No. 34
Charles Villiers Stanford
Discovery and Invention
King William IV (1830-1837)
Ireland’s First Railway
The Dublin to Dun Laoghaire line opened in 1834, and proved a remarkable testimony to the speed of technological progress.

THE first railway in Ireland was the Dublin and Kingstown Railway, which opened on 9th October 1834 with a train of eight carriages drawn by the steam locomotive ‘Hibernia’, a 2-2-0 designed by Richard Roberts of Manchester.

The line was paid for by Dublin businessmen, keen to transport goods in bulk between the city and the port at Kingstown, better known today as Dun Laoghaire.

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No. 35
John Field
Frederick Douglass
King George III (1760-1820) to Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
A Selfish Liberty
American anti-slavery campaigner Frederick Douglass contrasts two kinds of ‘nationalist’.
By Frederick Douglass
(1818-1895)

IT was not long after my seeing Mr O’Connell that his health broke down, and his career ended in death. I felt that a great champion of freedom had fallen, and that the cause of the American slave, not less than the cause of his country, had met with a great loss.

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No. 36
Samuel Coleridge-Taylor
Frederick Douglass
King George III (1760-1820) to Queen Victoria (1837-1901)
Douglass’s Debt
British statesmen were among those who inspired the career of one of America’s greatest men, Frederick Douglass.
By Frederick Douglass
(1818-1895)

I MET there one of Sheridan’s mighty speeches, on the subject of Catholic Emancipation, Lord Chatham’s speech on the American War, and speeches by the great William Pitt, and by Fox.

These were all choice documents to me, and I read them over and over again, with an interest ever increasing, because it was ever gaining in intelligence; for the more I read them the better I understood them.

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No. 37
William Boyce
Character and Conduct
Sweet and Sour
The great Dr Johnson argues that you catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.
By Samuel Johnson
(1709-1784)

THAT a precept of courtesy is by no means unworthy of the gravity and dignity of an apostolical mandate, may be gathered from the pernicious effects which all must have observed to have arisen from harsh strictness and sour virtue; such as refuses to mingle in harmless gaiety, or give countenance to innocent amusements, or which transacts the petty business of the day with a gloomy ferociousness that clouds existence.

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No. 38
Liberty and Prosperity
The ‘Empire’ of Free Trade
Free trade brings to smaller nations all the advantages of empire without the disadvantages.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

WERE all nations to follow the liberal system of free exportation and free importation, the different states into which a great continent was divided would so far resemble the different provinces of a great empire.

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No. 39
Franz Joseph Haydn
Liberty and Prosperity
Man was not made for the Government
Good government is not about enforcing uniform order, but about maximising liberty among a particular people.
By Edmund Burke MP
(1729-1797)

LIBERTY, too, must be limited in order to be possessed. The degree of restraint it is impossible in any case to settle precisely.

But it ought to be the constant aim of every wise public council to find out by cautious experiments, and rational, cool endeavours, with how little, not how much, of this restraint the community can subsist.

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No. 40
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
Latest: Weir
Added on Sunday January 14th, 2018
Doublets (34)
Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
Latest: Stardust
Quickwords (46)
A mini-crossword of everyday vocabulary and general knowledge.
Triplets (23)
Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
Latest: Triplet No. 23
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
See how ingenious you can be in combining three randomly chosen words in one sentence.
Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
Latest: Target Number
Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
Latest: Letters Game
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
The magnificent cathedral at Durham owes its existence to a missing cow.
By John Locke
(1632-1704)
Some people are not more equal than others, nor are they entitled to more liberty.
England’s rulers from the only one named ‘the Great’, to the king who lost his crown to the Danes.
By Robert Louis Stevenson
(1850-1894)
The Master and his brother Henry must decide which of them goes to fight for Bonnie Prince Charlie.
By Charles Kingsley
(1819-75)
A last goodbye breathes promise of a merry meeting.

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Georgian Era (112)
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Stuart Era (17)
Tudor Era (11)
Adam Smith (10)
Polyword ‘Time’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘knock over and scatter’ (7 letters), and ‘a measure of length equal to 45 inches’ (3 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with TALL and finish with SHIP.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.