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Posts tagged Georgian Era (111)
Nos 61 to 70
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William Boyce
Liberty and Prosperity
Fit and Proper Persons
No one is more dangerous than the man who thinks that it is his destiny to direct things for the common good.
By Adam Smith
(1723-1790)

EVERY individual necessarily labours to render the annual revenue of the society as great as he can. He generally, indeed, neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it. Nor is it always the worse for the society that it was no part of it.

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No. 61
Richard Jones
Scottish History
King George II (1727-1760)
The Battle of Glen Shiel
King Philip V of Spain sent a second Spanish Armada against Britain, but it suffered much the same fate as the first.

WHEN Philip V of Spain, in preparation for his larger assault on France, annexed the islands of Sicily and Sardinia, a British fleet led by Sir George Byng upset his plans by defeating him at the Battle of Cape Passaro on 11th August, 1718.

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No. 62
John Field
Discovery and Invention
King George III (1760-1820)
The Bully and the Brakesman
A young George Stephenson takes responsibility for the team spirit at Black Callerton mine.

ON one occasion, Stephenson’s handling of the winding mechanism displeased miner Ned Nelson, who on reaching the top berated him offensively.

This Nelson was a notorious bully, used to getting his own way, so he was taken aback when instead of cowering, Stephenson defended himself honestly.

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No. 63
George Frideric Handel
Napoleonic Wars
King George III (1760-1820)
The Battle of Trafalgar
At the cost of his own life, Lord Nelson showed Napoleon that he could rule neither Britain nor the waves.

IN 1805, the French fleet was not at its height. Many able officers had been executed in the Revolution, and memories were still raw of Nelson’s victory at the Battle of the Nile in 1798.

Napoleon therefore planned to ally with the Spanish fleet at Cadíz, before daring to confront the Royal Navy in the English Channel.

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No. 64
Jan Ladislav Dussek
Discovery and Invention
Jesty and Jenner’s Jab
Benjamin Jesty and Edward Jenner continue to save millions of lives because they listened to an old wives’ tale.

BENJAMIN JESTY, a Dorsetshire farmer, heard from his dairymaids that the skin-rash caused by cowpox had one blessing: once you’d had it, you didn’t get smallpox.

So when smallpox broke out in Yetminster in 1774, Benjamin deliberately infected his wife Elizabeth and their two sons with cowpox, giving them lifelong immunity.

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No. 65
Ignaz Moscheles
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
The Bombardment of Algiers
For two centuries, human traffickers had stolen English men, women and children for the slave-markets of the Arab world.

WITHIN fifty years of victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588, England’s navy was so neglected that Arab pirates from the Barbary coast were raiding Cornish villages and commandeering fishing-boats with impunity, abducting hundreds of men, women and children for slave-labour in docks and on farms, down mines and in homes across the Ottoman Empire.

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No. 66
Jan Ladislav Dussek
Liberty and Prosperity
The Small Compass
The role of government in a nation’s prosperity is important but limited.
By Jeremy Bentham
(1748-1832)

THE motto, or watchword of government, on these occasions, ought to be — Be quiet.

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No. 67
George Frideric Handel
Modern History
King George II (1727-1760)
The ‘Black Hole’ of Calcutta
The inhuman cruelty of the Nawab of Bengal’s men brought swift retribution on their master.

CALCUTTA in 1756 was an uneasy trading centre within Bengal, home to French, Dutch and English merchants; but it was wealthy, growing, and tended not to pay its exorbitant taxes, and the young Nawab of Bengal, Siraj ud-Daulah, saw it as a threat.

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No. 68
George Frideric Handel
Modern History
King George II (1727-1760)
Courage Under Fire
Robert Clive turned seven hundred frightened recruits into crack troops by sheer force of personality.

IN the Spring of 1752, Robert Clive’s poor health prompted him to return to England, but he was determined to rob the French of the forts of Covelong, a fishing village twenty-five miles south of Madras, and neighbouring Chingleput, before he left.

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No. 69
2 two-part story
Charles Avison
Modern History
King George III (1760-1820)
The Case of Jonathan Strong
Granville Sharp and his surgeon brother William rescued a young African man from the streets of London.

ONE day in 1767, Granville Sharp received a letter from a Jonathan Strong, saying he was in jail and needed help. Unable to put a face to the name, Sharp made enquiries at the jail but was told no such person existed. So he went to see for himself.

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No. 70
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Polywords (183)
Make as many words as you can from the letters of a nine-letter word.
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Turn one word into another, changing just one letter each time.
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Find one common letter that will turn three words into three new ones.
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Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
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Compose sentences showing the difference in meaning, grammar or usage between these words.
Practise your basic arithmetic, from multiplation tables to percentages.
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Take command of English grammar and composition with these traditional exercises.
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A word search game with a dash of strategy.
From our Archive
Passengers sharing Bishop Nicholas’s Moscow-bound flight found his blessings faintly silly, but that was when the engines were running.
The inhuman cruelty of the Nawab of Bengal’s men brought swift retribution on their master.
Music by
Thomas Erskine, Earl of Kellie
An 18th century bon viveur and virtuoso violinist, Thomas Erskine is currently being ‘rediscovered’ by the classical music industry.
By Samuel Smiles
(1812-1904)
Two famous figures, one from the sciences and one from the arts, who turned suffering to advantage.
A struggle between rival Royal Houses during the 15th century

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Polyword ‘Meow!’
Make as many words as you can with the letters below. All your words must be at least four letters long, and must also include the highlighted letter. What’s the nine-letter word?

SEE how many words you can make using the letters below. All your words must be at least 4 letters long, and must include the letter (change).

We found commonly used words, plus one 9-letter word. Can you do better?

Use each letter only once. But if there are e.g. two As, you can used them both.

Don’t count proper nouns such as April, Zeus, or Newcastle (pretty much anything that has to be spelled with a capital letter at the start), or acronyms like HMRC.

Don’t just add -S for plurals or third person singular verbs, e.g. CAT → CATS or SPEAK → SPEAKS.

More Word Games
A word search game with a dash of strategy.
Guess these words letter by letter – before the cats are gone!
Do you know ‘glittering crown’ (6 letters), and ‘dark, gloomy and clouded’ (5 letters)?
Changing one letter at a time, see if you can start with MILE and finish with POST.
Find the magic letter that can change three words into three different ones.